Tag Archives: Tyson

Commando Issues 4971 – 4974 – On Sale 1st December 2016

Commando Issues 4971 – 4974 – On Sale 1st December 2016

 

Island of Last Hope — Commando No 4971  

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In 1938, Germany invaded Poland…but Poland did not give in without a fight.

Captain Micha Polanski and the Polish Air Force fought valiantly against the might of the Luftwaffe. But when his brother was slaughtered, Micha swore vengeance against the plane that cut him down, the plane that bore the symbol of a Black Eagle and Swastika.

Micha was sent to Britain to continue the fight against Nazis, but he still hoped he would see that plane again and avenge his brother. As for Micha and many other Poles, Britain was wyspa ostatniej nadziei… The Island of Last Hope.

Story: Shane Filer  Art: Muller  Cover: Ian Kennedy

 


Stringbag Ace — Commando No 4972 

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They said HMS Adventurer was a haunted ship; haunted by a shadowy figure bent on sending the carrier to the bottom with all her planes and crew.

Mystery lights flashed at night to guide enemy bombers to her. Men were struck down in shadowy corners and never knew what hit them. Guns jammed, planes blew up. Death, sudden and baffling, stalked by night along the quiet alleyways of the ship…

And a young flight lieutenant wanted to get his Spitfires and their pilots to Malta in one piece.

Story: Tyson  Art: Peter Ford  Cover: Ken Barr

Introduction

If you’re searching for an outstanding adventure then look no further than this maritime gem. Tyson contrasts the claustrophobic confines of the HMS. Adventurer with the endless vistas of the skies to create a tense tale of ships, sabotage and Stringbags.

To top it all off, this issue boasts a truly dynamic cover, courtesy of iconic and greatly missed Commando artist, Ken Barr. Set at a dizzying angle, it’s a dramatic and exhilarating depiction of aerial action.

The Commando Team

Stringbag Ace, originally Commando No 265 (June 1967), reissued as No 935 (May 1975)

 


Mountie Hunter — Commando No 4973 

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Mounties Drew Fraser and Ross McKinley were partners and best friends. But when Drew enlisted in the Canadian Army, Ross was left behind.

However, Mountie life was far from quiet for Ross as the destruction of the war in Europe had extended its deathly claw all the way to Canada. Trains and supply lines were being targeted with ruthless precision, destroying vital supplies for the Allies. So ruthless in fact it spelled only one thing – sabotage!

Hunting the German spies would push Drew to the edge and force him to make the ultimate sacrifice. But a Mountie always gets his man…

Story: Alan Hebden  Art: Vicente Alcazar  Cover: Janek Matysiak

 


Press Gang — Commando No 4974 

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Front-line action from the London blitz right through to the final American triumph against the Japanese in the Pacific. Not bad for a man invalided out of the RAF in 1940 and not even in the fighting forces.

But then RD Jones was a press photographer and he and his mate Tommy Vidler were a two-man team of war correspondents, risking death to get the news to their readers at home.

 

 

Story: Alan Hemus  Art: Manuel Benet  Cover: Ian Kennedy

Introduction

Alan Hemus’ celebration of wartime correspondents is a boyish adventure that runs the full length of the Second World War, from the London Blitz to the final days of the Pacific War.

There is a great array of characters and show-stopping set pieces, all brought to life by the dynamic pen and brushes of artist, Manuel Benet. Benet is a true Commando Comics veteran, still illustrating new issues to this day, so it’s a real treat to be able to share some of his earlier artwork – enjoy!

The Commando Team

Press Gang, originally Commando No 2479 (June 1991)

 

 

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Commando Issues 4915-4918

Commando Issues 4915-4918

 

Nemesis Of The North — Commando No 4915

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Smolenskaya Ostrov, a small island in the Barents Sea, was feared by the Russians, who had given it a much more ominous name — the Island of Death. This inhospitable place was uninhabited, apart from the packs of the ferocious polar bears who roamed its barren wastes.

Now, “Jelly” Jakes, Titch Mooney and the rest of the Convict Commandos were tasked with preventing the outbreak of a deadly virus — if they could survive long enough to complete their mission.

Story: Alan Hebden  Art: Manuel Benet  Cover: Manuel Benet

 


Duel To The Death — Commando No 4916 

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It was like a duel between two knights of old. Each combatant knew the look and reputation of the other. Only this time, on one side was a giant white Sunderland flying-boat and on the other, a black-hulled German submarine, the U-37. Dick Stapleton and an Aussie crew flew the “Flying Porcupine”; the merciless Nazi, Kapitan von Bloeke, commanded the U-37.

The North Sea convoy routes just weren’t big enough for both of them…

Introduction

Sanfelix’s stunning cover image perfectly encapsulates a truly thrilling sequence from this book (and it’s on pages 10-13, if you wish to skip ahead). Expertly drawn by veteran interior artist Gordon Livingstone, one of our heroes attempts to extinguish an engine fire on the wing of his Sunderland Flying Boat…while it is still in the air.

As far as I’m aware, I’ve never seen anything quite as daring as that in many years as a Commando reader and, latterly, as a Commando staffer. Wonderful stuff indeed.

Scott Montgomery, Deputy Editor

Duel To The Death, originally Commando No 210 (April 1966)

Story: Tyson  Art: Gordon Livingstone  Cover: Sanfelix

 


Death On The Ground — Commando No 4917

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In 1963, in the skies above a group of remote islands in the South Pacific, many military aircraft disappeared without trace — so many, if fact, that the area became known as the “New Guinea Triangle”.

When R.A.F. Flight Lieutenant Jon Day, and his C.O., Squadron Leader Richard Gibson, became embroiled in the mystery, they discovered that their dangerous foe was on the ground as well as in the air.

The Englishmen would have to improvise and use their wits to survive — even if that meant using captured weapons to bat away enemy grenades!

Story: Steve Coombs  Art: Morahin  Cover: Janek Matysiak

 


Eagle In The Sun — Commando No 4918 – 

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In the air war over Russia Anton Pozetski found life dangerous and confusing. It was easy to identify the enemy — they were the Germans and they shot at you. However, it wasn’t so easy to identify your friends. For a start, the Political Commissar and the Squadron Commander were apt to stab you in the back and they regarded the RAF as enemies.

Life was going to prove even more difficult for Anton when he joined an RAF squadron on active service.

Introduction

All of our artists are very versatile and capable of drawing any subject. However, even after five decades, Ian Kennedy is still usually our first port of call whenever we need an aeronautical cover. So, I imagine that’s what happened back in 1991 when the then-editorial team wanted an illustration featuring a Russian Polikarpov 1-16 using its propeller to shred the tail fin of an enemy Heinkel 111 bomber. Featuring Ian’s usual dynamic style and sense of drama, this is yet another prime example of his legendary work.

Scott Montgomery, Deputy Editor

Eagle In The Sun, originally Commando No 2497 (August 1991)

Story: Ian Clark  Art: Terry Patrick  Cover: Ian Kennedy