Tag Archives: Stephen Walsh

Commando Issues 4979 – 4982 – On Sale 29th December 2016

Commando Issues 4979 – 4982 – On Sale 29th December 2016

Sucker Punch – Commando No 4979 

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Captured by SS men for desertion and sentenced to firing squad by his own countrymen, German naval officer, Franz Beuten, was saved by British Special Service operatives, Lieutenant Tom Dell, Sergeant Mark Lyle and Corporal Roger Crown, on duty deep behind enemy lines.

After Germany’s surrender, the SAS troop was tasked with tracking down Nazi war criminals. An unlikely alliance was formed between Franz and the SAS boys. Together they made sure they dealt the Nazis a deadly…SUCKER PUNCH

Story: George Low  Art: Vila  Cover: Ian Kennedy


Flying Phantom – Commando No 4980


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Tom Hardy, ex-Spitfire ace and Dave Rogers, radar operator, were a night-fighter team. They flew in a Beaufighter, but they never got results. Sometimes the radar broke down, once it caught fire. They even found themselves chasing friendly planes.

Then something new was added to the team. On their night flights it was always with them, an unearthly presence glowing with an eerie green light, like a being from another world – and it turned Tom and Dave into real night-fighter aces.

Story: McOwan  Art: Quesada  Cover: Ken Barr

Introduction

Amongst the action and adventure of the front lines, Commando Comics often ventured into the weird and wonderful world of fantasy and science fiction. The Flying Phantom is an exciting example of this alternative take on telling war stories.

McOwan successfully mixed a traditional narrative of fighter pilots striving to be the very best with ancient legend to create a truly memorable plot, brought to life by Quesada’s beautiful illustrations. Perhaps the most enticing element of Flying Phantom is Ken Barr’s bold, stunning cover. This gripping tale mixes mystery and magic, leaving readers flying high long after the end.

The Commando Team

Flying Phantom, originally Commando No 266 (June 1967), reissued as No 939 (June 1975).



Yuri’s Revenge – Commando No 4981

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Yuri Murayev, former member of Russia’s elite Spetznaz shock forces, had proven himself time and again to be a thorn in the side of media mogul and would-be dictator, Anatoly Speck.

But when Speck kidnaps British SAS agent Douglas Trent, Yuri knows it is time to take the fight directly to the enemy and put an end to Speck’s deadly conspiracies and political intrigues for once and for all. He has been hunted, beaten and framed – now it’s time for YURI’S REVENGE.

Story: Stephen Walsh  Art: Manuel Benet  Cover: Manuel Benet


Everything Under Control – Commando No 4982

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Jim Farrow’s war as a navigator had got off to quite a start. Before he’d even qualified, he’d dragged an injured pilot out of his seat and landed the aircraft by himself.

When he was transferred to a Hampden squadron, someone told him that if the same thing happened again, he didn’t stand a chance of getting the pilot away from the controls – for the Hampden cockpit was only three feet across. “Flying coffins,” they called them.

Then one day it happened…

Story: RA Montague  Art: José Maria Jorge  Cover: Ian Kennedy

Introduction

RA Montague’s tale of a dysfunctional bomber crew highlights the teamwork, communication and trust flight crews needed during the Second World War. The bomber teams had great faith in their navigators, who were central players in performing successful air raids, avoiding conflict, hitting targets, and returning safely. In a tale of courage and comradery, José Maria Jorge skilfully captures the tension and terror of being part of a bomber crew.

Follow our hero, Jim Farrow, through a turbulent adventure as he attempts to keep Everything Under Control.

The Commando Team.

Everything Under Control, originally Commando No 1194 (January 1978), reissued as No 2492 (August 1991).

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Commando Issues 4967-4970 – On Sale 17th November 2016

Commando Issues 4967-4970 – On Sale 17th November 2016

 

Goulash Grenadiers — Commando No 4967

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Wrong time, wrong place and wrong soldiers. Mistaken for SAS, Abe, Cyril and Mike were in trouble. Being captured behind enemy lines was a nightmare for any British Soldier. But these men weren’t just any kind of soldiers…they were cooks.

Pressed working alongside Wehrmacht cooks, Abe, Cyril and Mike were left in a sticky situation. Tensions were close to boiling point until the power of Yorkshire puddings helped six men, enemies by war, become friends in catering.

Story: George Low  Art: Keith Page  Cover: Keith Page

 


Hoodoo Ship — Commando No 4968

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At long last, Sub-lieutenant Roy Palmer and merchant captain Brian Miller had found the island supply base from which U-boat packs slipped anchor to attack Allied convoys in the South Atlantic.

But, only after they’d been adrift for days with two boatloadas of tired, unarmed men. They didn’t even have a radio to pass on the vital news.

What could they do? Not much at all it seemed, until Roy found an ancient cannon and remembered a tale about red hot cannonballs…

Story: Powell  Art: C.T. Rigby  Cover: Ken Barr

Introduction

Powell’s thrilling storytelling, coupled with the unusual title of this issue, makes Hoodoo Ship an exciting and rambunctious read!

Playing on the classic trope of a suspicious seaman, Powell invokes the tense atmosphere of a ship with more than a little hoodoo going on. Objects go missing, the boilers are sabotaged and the crew is attacked by an unseen, ghostly assailant…or so it seems.

The star of the script is Powell’s perfect villain, Oberleutnant Franz Von Reitz. He’s unforgiving, merciless and calculating – everything you love to hate in a Commando villain. He keeps our hero on his toes and makes Hoodoo Ship a truly bewitching book!

The Commando Team

Hoodoo Ship, originally Commando No 255 (April 1967)

 


Yuri: On the Run — Commando No 4969

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Yuri Murayev, ex-Spetznaz Commando, thought that his troubles were behind him. But he hadn’t reckoned on Anatoly Speck, the sinister Russian billionaire who had made it his business to destroy the former commando.

Framed for murder, and on the run, Yuri finds himself in a deadly cat and mouse game, wanted by both the Russian underworld and his old friends in the SAS. With bullets flying, and the casualties mounting, it’s up to Yuri to clear his name before it’s too late!

Story: Stephen Walsh  Art: Manuel Benet  Cover: Manuel Benet

 


The Diamond Smugglers — Commando No 4970

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When you want an agent to penetrate an enemy-occupied country and stay free long enough to do a tricky job, you ned someone who’s used to getting around without attracting attention. Who better than a man who smuggled diamonds in and out of that very country for years?

But there’s a difference between peace-time and war. Before, the worst that could happen to him was to be put in jail. Now, if he was caught, he faced certain death!

 

Story: Bernard Gregg  Art: Llops  Cover: Ian Kennedy

Introduction

This brilliant adventure follows two friends divided and reunited by war and adversary shapes us, and is brought to life with stunning visuals by classic interior artist, Llops. For our heroes, Jan and Tom, the Second World War offers them a restored friendship, and a renewed sense of heroism and purpose. For ferocious Nazi officer Driebrick (another brilliantly drawn, snarling Commando villain), however, the war is a gateway to greater treachery.

Add to this thrilling rivalry and riveting artwork, another atmospheric cover from master artist Ian Kennedy, and you have a recipe for a truly gripping yarn!

The Commando Team

The Diamond Smugglers, originally Commando No 1138 (June 1977), reissued as No 2468 (May 1991)

 

 

Commando Issues 4955-4958 – On Sale 6th October 2016

Commando Issues 4955-4958 – On Sale 6th October 2016

 

Midnight Mission — Commando No 4955

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Flight Sergeant Nick Nolan was a reliable, thoughtful type. He yearned to fly a fighter like a Spitfire or Hurricane but his superiors reckoned he “didn’t have enough fire in his belly”.

Nonetheless, he undoubtedly had skills so Nick was selected to transport secret agents and supplies into German-held France. Aboard his Westland Lysander, the pilot never knew what dangers might spring from the darkness – dangers like a marauding Junkers 88 Night-fighter out for the kill!

Story: George Low  Art: Vicente Alcazar  Cover: Ian Kennedy

 


Fortress Of Fear — Commando No 4956

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“Subito! Quickly! Across the road, no noise, no lights — the German lorries come. In them are the captured British Commandos sent to blow up the secret arsenal beneath Castello Santuzzo.

“These men are trained to do what we can never hope to. They must be freed and aided. Who knows, it might be that in return they will make sure that at least one Commando knife slips into the black heart of Kommandant Von Schneider.

“He has tortured and killed too many of us. His time has come. We, the mountain men of the Italian resistance, will make it so.

“So quickly, quietly…”

Story: Spence  Art: Quesada  Cover: Segrelles

Introduction

In order to fight a Nazi threat, a squad of British Commandos form an uneasy alliance with a ragged resistance group hiding in the Italian hills.

What’s different about this book is that the back cover blurb is written in the first person – from the point of view of one of the resistance men. It’s quite a rare occurrence but is certainly effective in conveying immediate drama – and I’m surprised that Commando hasn’t done this kind of thing more often.

Scott Montgomery, Deputy Editor

Fortress Of Fear, originally Commando No 261 (May 1967), re-issued as No 931 (May 1977)

 


Yuri’s Return — Commando No 4957

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Yuri Muryavev, a retired “Shock Force” Spetznaz Commando, had settled in the UK but, after the collapse of communism, he returned to his Russian homeland. Wishing to do honest work, he took on a job offer to provide security for an aid agency operating in South America.

However, Yuri did not realise that he was in the employ of Anatoly Speck, a sinister Russian billionaire who had plans to wreak havoc upon the world.

Now the former soldier faced a danger even greater than ever before and only he could stop it…

Story: Stephen Walsh  Art: Manuel Benet  Cover: Manuel Benet

 


The Pony Soldiers — Commando No 4958

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Horses against tanks and aircraft? Not a recipe for success, you’d think. But that was the best that was available for a gallant band of guerrillas – men and boys – battling against the Japanese in the Philippine Islands… as they waited for the Americans to return and set them free.

 

 

Story: Ian Clark  Art: C.T. Rigby  Cover: Phil Gascoine

Introduction

We’ve been very fortunate throughout Commando’s 55-year history that our versatile artists can draw anything – from tanks to battleships, aircraft to infantry. But, unlikely as it sounds, a few artists have told us that horses are a challenge to draw well.

As a non-artist myself, I’m not sure why this might be – presumably the amount of detail required to render each beast must be very time-consuming. So I can only imagine how an illustrator might shudder when they read scripts with words like: “A horde of cavalry riders storm across a crowded battlefield…”

However, as you will see, veteran Commando stalwarts C. T. Rigby and Phil Gascoine have risen to the occasion.

Scott Montgomery, Deputy Editor

The Pony Soldiers, originally Commando No 2457 (March 1991)

Wet And Dry (But Mainly Wet)

There’s a distinctly watery feel to this latest batch of Commando stories (Issues 4899-4902 – On Sale 24th March 2016 in the UK). Until you get to the last one where the Phil Gascoine’s dusty khaki-coloured cover leaves you in no doubt that this is a waterless waste.

But that’s not what struck me most. Not for the first time, this selection illustrates (ho ho) the freedom that the war comic allows the writer when it comes to locations. This bunch have two in the Far East, one in Northern India and a fourth in Greece. Okay so a writer could put their characters in any one of these locations but, given the global nature of war from the 19th Century on, that writer doesn’t have to make up any reason for their characters to be there beyond the Services sending them. And that allows characters the reader can readily identify with, both culturally and physically. And that allows them to identify with the experience of the players is the story.

That identification is of a totally different kind to that experienced when reading of the adventures of another spandex-covered super and lay at the core of most British war comics. The difference between the superhero and the everyman hero.

No prizes for guessing my preference.


Massacre In Malaya — Commando No 4899

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In the arid jungles of Malaya in 1941, British and Commonwealth forces held out against the relentless advance of the Japanese.

Private Josh Combe and his unit were determined to protect the life of a civilian boy who had been left silent, traumatised and alone by the murderous actions of a pair of enemy officers.

In a last-ditch attempt to get to friendly territory they would have to take to the river to survive.

 

 

Story: George Low Art: Olivera/Rodriguez Cover: Janek Matysiak

Preview: Massacre In Malaya


Sailor With Wings — Commando No 4900

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Lieutenant-Commander Jim Treggaron, pilot in the Fleet Air Arm, had the blood of the old Cornish pirates in his veins — or so his men said. Otherwise, he’d never have tried to organise his Swordfish squadron to operate from a little beach in Greece. They were supposed to fly from their aircraft carrier.

However, Jim found a bunch of tough Resistance helpers, a cave full of old RAF fuel and ammo, and a beach long enough for take-off.

The Italian navy was in handy range so zooming into action went the

SAILOR WITH WINGS

Introduction

Peter Ford is undoubtedly one of Commando’s unsung heroes from the earliest days of the title — and is a rare example of an excellent artist who was also a great scriptwriter. In terms of art, one of his specialties was aircraft illustration. Even from the first, dynamic page opposite it is apparent that we’re in for an action-packed, aeronautical treat.

Buccheri’s cover is superb too — although one does wonder if Peter Ford had hankered to supply the cover too and make this book a creative Commando hat-trick!

Scott Montgomery, Deputy Editor

Sailor With Wings, originally Commando No 239 (December 1966)

Story: Peter Ford Art: Peter Ford Cover: Buccheri

PreviewSailor With Wings


 

Full Steam Ahead — Commando No 4901

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So, just how did two downed Royal Australian Air Force pilots end up on a secluded Pacific island — as prisoners of a long-forgotten Imperial German Navy unit whose unhinged leader was determined to complete a decades-old mission?

Sergeant Matt Herford and Corporal Ben MacAuley would have to commandeer an ancient, steam-powered torpedo boat in an attempt to escape and warn their superiors of an imminent threat.

It’s a tall tale indeed, fantastic in every sense of the word.

 

 

Story: Stephen Walsh Art: Keith Page Cover: Keith Page

PreviewFull Steam Ahead

 


 

Branded A Coward — Commando No 4902

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The heroic last stand of Lieutenant Hugh Overton in the mountains of the Indian North-West Frontier won even the respect of the enemy tribesmen who had wiped out his patrol to a man.

Yet by his own people Hugh was branded a coward, a deserter who had fled in terror in the face of the enemy, condemning his men to death!

 

Introduction

At first glance you might think that this book has several overly familiar traits that you might expect to find in a Commando story.

An officer wrongly accused of cowardice. Check.

An object – in this instance a silver cigar case – which serves as an important plot-point, or “macguffin“, according to film director Alfred Hitchcock. Check.

A relative of the accused who is determined to find out the truth. Check.

However, thanks to the conviction of all the creators involved, it all still works — no matter how superficially familiar the tropes of the tale itself may seem.

Scott Montgomery, Deputy Editor

Branded A Coward, originally Commando No 2440 (January 1991)

Story: C.G. Walker Art: Keith Shone Cover: Phil Gascoine

Preview: Branded A Coward