Tag Archives: Quesada

Commando Issues 4979 – 4982 – On Sale 29th December 2016

Commando Issues 4979 – 4982 – On Sale 29th December 2016

Sucker Punch – Commando No 4979 

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Captured by SS men for desertion and sentenced to firing squad by his own countrymen, German naval officer, Franz Beuten, was saved by British Special Service operatives, Lieutenant Tom Dell, Sergeant Mark Lyle and Corporal Roger Crown, on duty deep behind enemy lines.

After Germany’s surrender, the SAS troop was tasked with tracking down Nazi war criminals. An unlikely alliance was formed between Franz and the SAS boys. Together they made sure they dealt the Nazis a deadly…SUCKER PUNCH

Story: George Low  Art: Vila  Cover: Ian Kennedy


Flying Phantom – Commando No 4980


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Tom Hardy, ex-Spitfire ace and Dave Rogers, radar operator, were a night-fighter team. They flew in a Beaufighter, but they never got results. Sometimes the radar broke down, once it caught fire. They even found themselves chasing friendly planes.

Then something new was added to the team. On their night flights it was always with them, an unearthly presence glowing with an eerie green light, like a being from another world – and it turned Tom and Dave into real night-fighter aces.

Story: McOwan  Art: Quesada  Cover: Ken Barr

Introduction

Amongst the action and adventure of the front lines, Commando Comics often ventured into the weird and wonderful world of fantasy and science fiction. The Flying Phantom is an exciting example of this alternative take on telling war stories.

McOwan successfully mixed a traditional narrative of fighter pilots striving to be the very best with ancient legend to create a truly memorable plot, brought to life by Quesada’s beautiful illustrations. Perhaps the most enticing element of Flying Phantom is Ken Barr’s bold, stunning cover. This gripping tale mixes mystery and magic, leaving readers flying high long after the end.

The Commando Team

Flying Phantom, originally Commando No 266 (June 1967), reissued as No 939 (June 1975).



Yuri’s Revenge – Commando No 4981

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Yuri Murayev, former member of Russia’s elite Spetznaz shock forces, had proven himself time and again to be a thorn in the side of media mogul and would-be dictator, Anatoly Speck.

But when Speck kidnaps British SAS agent Douglas Trent, Yuri knows it is time to take the fight directly to the enemy and put an end to Speck’s deadly conspiracies and political intrigues for once and for all. He has been hunted, beaten and framed – now it’s time for YURI’S REVENGE.

Story: Stephen Walsh  Art: Manuel Benet  Cover: Manuel Benet


Everything Under Control – Commando No 4982

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Jim Farrow’s war as a navigator had got off to quite a start. Before he’d even qualified, he’d dragged an injured pilot out of his seat and landed the aircraft by himself.

When he was transferred to a Hampden squadron, someone told him that if the same thing happened again, he didn’t stand a chance of getting the pilot away from the controls – for the Hampden cockpit was only three feet across. “Flying coffins,” they called them.

Then one day it happened…

Story: RA Montague  Art: José Maria Jorge  Cover: Ian Kennedy

Introduction

RA Montague’s tale of a dysfunctional bomber crew highlights the teamwork, communication and trust flight crews needed during the Second World War. The bomber teams had great faith in their navigators, who were central players in performing successful air raids, avoiding conflict, hitting targets, and returning safely. In a tale of courage and comradery, José Maria Jorge skilfully captures the tension and terror of being part of a bomber crew.

Follow our hero, Jim Farrow, through a turbulent adventure as he attempts to keep Everything Under Control.

The Commando Team.

Everything Under Control, originally Commando No 1194 (January 1978), reissued as No 2492 (August 1991).

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Commando Issues 4955-4958 – On Sale 6th October 2016

Commando Issues 4955-4958 – On Sale 6th October 2016

 

Midnight Mission — Commando No 4955

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Flight Sergeant Nick Nolan was a reliable, thoughtful type. He yearned to fly a fighter like a Spitfire or Hurricane but his superiors reckoned he “didn’t have enough fire in his belly”.

Nonetheless, he undoubtedly had skills so Nick was selected to transport secret agents and supplies into German-held France. Aboard his Westland Lysander, the pilot never knew what dangers might spring from the darkness – dangers like a marauding Junkers 88 Night-fighter out for the kill!

Story: George Low  Art: Vicente Alcazar  Cover: Ian Kennedy

 


Fortress Of Fear — Commando No 4956

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“Subito! Quickly! Across the road, no noise, no lights — the German lorries come. In them are the captured British Commandos sent to blow up the secret arsenal beneath Castello Santuzzo.

“These men are trained to do what we can never hope to. They must be freed and aided. Who knows, it might be that in return they will make sure that at least one Commando knife slips into the black heart of Kommandant Von Schneider.

“He has tortured and killed too many of us. His time has come. We, the mountain men of the Italian resistance, will make it so.

“So quickly, quietly…”

Story: Spence  Art: Quesada  Cover: Segrelles

Introduction

In order to fight a Nazi threat, a squad of British Commandos form an uneasy alliance with a ragged resistance group hiding in the Italian hills.

What’s different about this book is that the back cover blurb is written in the first person – from the point of view of one of the resistance men. It’s quite a rare occurrence but is certainly effective in conveying immediate drama – and I’m surprised that Commando hasn’t done this kind of thing more often.

Scott Montgomery, Deputy Editor

Fortress Of Fear, originally Commando No 261 (May 1967), re-issued as No 931 (May 1977)

 


Yuri’s Return — Commando No 4957

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Yuri Muryavev, a retired “Shock Force” Spetznaz Commando, had settled in the UK but, after the collapse of communism, he returned to his Russian homeland. Wishing to do honest work, he took on a job offer to provide security for an aid agency operating in South America.

However, Yuri did not realise that he was in the employ of Anatoly Speck, a sinister Russian billionaire who had plans to wreak havoc upon the world.

Now the former soldier faced a danger even greater than ever before and only he could stop it…

Story: Stephen Walsh  Art: Manuel Benet  Cover: Manuel Benet

 


The Pony Soldiers — Commando No 4958

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Horses against tanks and aircraft? Not a recipe for success, you’d think. But that was the best that was available for a gallant band of guerrillas – men and boys – battling against the Japanese in the Philippine Islands… as they waited for the Americans to return and set them free.

 

 

Story: Ian Clark  Art: C.T. Rigby  Cover: Phil Gascoine

Introduction

We’ve been very fortunate throughout Commando’s 55-year history that our versatile artists can draw anything – from tanks to battleships, aircraft to infantry. But, unlikely as it sounds, a few artists have told us that horses are a challenge to draw well.

As a non-artist myself, I’m not sure why this might be – presumably the amount of detail required to render each beast must be very time-consuming. So I can only imagine how an illustrator might shudder when they read scripts with words like: “A horde of cavalry riders storm across a crowded battlefield…”

However, as you will see, veteran Commando stalwarts C. T. Rigby and Phil Gascoine have risen to the occasion.

Scott Montgomery, Deputy Editor

The Pony Soldiers, originally Commando No 2457 (March 1991)

Commando issues 4943-4946 – On Sale 25 August 2016

Commando issues 4943-49446 – On Sale 25 August 2016

Ice-Cold Combat — Commando No 4943  

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When their Handley Page Hampden bomber was shot down, Pilot Officer Drew Grange and Sergeant Adam Weir were stranded on the icy border between Norway and Russia.

Helped by a couple of civilian hunters, the R.A.F. men were soon embroiled in a fight for survival. Finding an unarmed, abandoned Tiger Moth ski-plane, they took to the skies above the remote, frozen frontier in a desperate attempt to get warn their allies of an imminent Nazi threat.

Story: George Low  Art: Manuel Benet  Cover: Manuel Benet


Ghost Squadron — Commando No 4944

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Flak, machine-guns, searchlights, enemy fighters – these the Nazi pilots knew and could handle. These things were dangerous, all right – but they didn’t turn a man’s blood to ice water in his veins, they didn’t paralyse his hands on the controls in utter, freezing terror…

But the new weapon used by the RAF night-fighters – The “Ghost Squadron” – put the fear of death into every Nazi pilot unlucky enough to come within its range.

Introduction

In this book there are several worthy ingredients which make for a satisfying Commando yarn: We have a glory-hunting pilot – Flight Lieutenant Buck Lee, determined to notch up as many kills as possible in his Mosquito bomber; the story title hints at supernatural activity; and we soon discover that some kind of shadowy, top secret, experimental weapon is also involved.

This is a great adventure, with Boutland’s script brought vividly to life by Quesada’s art and Buccheri’s eerie cover.

Scott Montgomery, Deputy Editor

Ghost Squadron, originally Commando No 247 (February 1967), re-issued as No 895 (December 1974)

Story: Boutland  Art: Quesada  Cover: Buccheri


Undefeated —Commando No 4945 

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Troubled by a past encounter early in his career, Royal Navy Lieutenant Commander Alec Weston soon became a respected, if intense, skipper. He was determined that his submarine, HMS Undefeated, would live up to her name — therefore he pushed his crew and the vessel hard.

When ferrying a Special Boat Section assault team on a secret mission in the Mediterranean, Alec was faced with a tough decision that affected the lives of that Special Forces unit. Such was the burden of command…

Story: Steve Taylor  Art: Olivera/Rodriguez  Cover: Janek Matysiak


Coward in Khaki — Commando No 4946 

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Men’s characters don’t often change. If a man’s a crook in civilian life, he’ll probably be a crook in the army. That’s how it was with Vic Wardley.

Everyone knew him to be a crook – and a coward as well. So why would an Intelligence Corps Major single him out for a vital job in contact with the enemy?

Introduction

Very generally speaking, Commando usually deals in “heroes” and “villains”, with the battle lines clearly drawn. However, I’d venture that “Coward In Khaki” is an intriguing glimpse into what it might have been like if Commando had veered towards the anti-heroes prevalent in rival war comics like Battle and Action in their mid-1970s prime.

The story title is unscrupulous in its assessment of the eponymous character, Private Vic Wardley — we’re left in no doubt that he is an unsavoury type, to say the least — but perhaps he might change his ways by the time we reach the last page…?

Scott Montgomery, Deputy Editor

Coward In Khaki, originally Commando No 1125 (May 1977), re-issued as No 2451 (March 1991)

Story: Mike Knowles  Art: Mones  Cover: Ian Kennedy