Tag Archives: Gordon Livingstone

Commando Issues 4975 – 4978 – On Sale 15th December 2016

Commando Issues 4975 – 4978 – On Sale 15th December 2016

 

Flying Blind — Commando No 4975

Comm_4975_coverMaster.jpg

Sergeant Owain Howell was too headstrong for the RAF. Charged with insubordination, he found himself consigned to the ground crew, servicing the planes he had once hoped to fly. Travelling with his crew to Africa, he was shot down and stranded in Italy.

Squadron leader Leonard Brinkley, on the other hand, was a cool and experienced pilot. However, after a raid went disastrously wrong, Leonard found himself a Prisoner of War; unable to see, and unable to escape.

Together, they embarked on an audacious plan to rescue their teammates and return to Britain. But escaping the enemy is no mean feat when you’re… Flying Blind.

Story: Alan Hebden  Art: Morahin  Cover: Janek Matysiak

 


The Stolen Lanc — Commando No 4976

Comm_4976_coverMaster.jpg

Tom Cornish flew Spitfires and had lightning reactions to match. His brother, Mike, flew a Lancaster bomber, and was as safe and steady as a rock.

Too bad that Tom had a nasty habit of referring to “flying tramcars” and “lumbering Lancs”, or saying fighter pilots needed twice the skill and courage of bomber crews. To him bombing was about as risky as delivering milk.

Mike was so mad that he invited Tom aboard the Lanc for one of those “milk runs”.

Story: David Boutland  Art: Domingo  Cover: Ken Barr

Introduction 

The introduction of the Lancaster bomber in World War Two would change the face of air warfare, bringing with it enduring competition between bomber crews and fighter pilots. Such attitudes are brilliantly explored in David Boutland’s epic tale of sibling rivalry, as he perfectly captures the frustration of fighting for recognition.

The story of Mike and Tom Cornish is brought to life by Domingo’s striking artwork, not only capturing the fast-paced action, but establishing a fraught relationship between the brothers with subtle looks and body language. Framed by Ken Barr’s stunning cover art, The Stolen Lanc recognises the importance of the Lancaster bomber crew and the incredible risks they took on each of their missions.

The Commando Team

The Stolen Lanc, originally Commando No 271 (July 1967), reissued as No 951 (July 1975).

 


Strange Encounter — Commando No 4977

Comm_4977_coverMaster.jpg

Cadogan Strange thought he’d heard the last of the arrogant Major von Hunsdorff after Russian troops had thwarted the Major’s attempt to flee across the Pamirs to the Turkish Front. But a Prisoner of War camp could not hold Hunsdorff for long, and his escape brought these two foes face to face once again.

Desperate to use Afghanistan’s forces against the British, Hunsdorff defies orders from Berlin and leads his men towards Heart in an effort to seize power. With a score to settle and peace to maintain, it is up to respected veteran Cadogan Strange and his newfound ally, Lieutenant Frank Gibson, to stop the rogue German troops from reaching their target – before it’s too late!

Story: Alan Hebden  Art: Morahin and Rezzonico  Cover: Ian Kennedy

 


The Cairo Secret — Commando No 4978

Comm_4978_coverMaster.jpg

A vast city, teeming with millions of people of all nationalities. Here in Cairo were spies, informers, saboteurs, as well as crooks, thieves, and assassins. Here many a dangerous plot was hatched, here much money could be made, and quickly. Here too, sudden death lay waiting…

 

 

 

 

Story: Lomas  Art: Gordon C. Livingstone  Cover: Ian Kennedy

Introduction 

When reluctant soldiers Len Potter and Tim Bates deserted the army to seek their fortune in Cairo, they could never have guessed that they would become central figures in sparking an uprising against the British. The Cairo Secret is a classic tale of twists and treachery, tapping into the revolutionary tensions in Egypt during the Second World War, and proving there was action – and danger – to be found far from the front lines.

Lomas’ cast of unpredictable characters teamed with Gordon Livingstone’s wonderful art creates an undercover story which throws us straight into the action, refusing to slow down until the very end.

The Commando Team

The Cairo Secret, originally Commando No 1130 (May 1977), reissued as No 2460 (April 1991)

 

 

Advertisements

Commando Issues 4915-4918

Commando Issues 4915-4918

 

Nemesis Of The North — Commando No 4915

Comm_4915_coverMaster

Smolenskaya Ostrov, a small island in the Barents Sea, was feared by the Russians, who had given it a much more ominous name — the Island of Death. This inhospitable place was uninhabited, apart from the packs of the ferocious polar bears who roamed its barren wastes.

Now, “Jelly” Jakes, Titch Mooney and the rest of the Convict Commandos were tasked with preventing the outbreak of a deadly virus — if they could survive long enough to complete their mission.

Story: Alan Hebden  Art: Manuel Benet  Cover: Manuel Benet

 


Duel To The Death — Commando No 4916 

Comm_4916_coverMaster

It was like a duel between two knights of old. Each combatant knew the look and reputation of the other. Only this time, on one side was a giant white Sunderland flying-boat and on the other, a black-hulled German submarine, the U-37. Dick Stapleton and an Aussie crew flew the “Flying Porcupine”; the merciless Nazi, Kapitan von Bloeke, commanded the U-37.

The North Sea convoy routes just weren’t big enough for both of them…

Introduction

Sanfelix’s stunning cover image perfectly encapsulates a truly thrilling sequence from this book (and it’s on pages 10-13, if you wish to skip ahead). Expertly drawn by veteran interior artist Gordon Livingstone, one of our heroes attempts to extinguish an engine fire on the wing of his Sunderland Flying Boat…while it is still in the air.

As far as I’m aware, I’ve never seen anything quite as daring as that in many years as a Commando reader and, latterly, as a Commando staffer. Wonderful stuff indeed.

Scott Montgomery, Deputy Editor

Duel To The Death, originally Commando No 210 (April 1966)

Story: Tyson  Art: Gordon Livingstone  Cover: Sanfelix

 


Death On The Ground — Commando No 4917

Comm_4917_coverMaster

In 1963, in the skies above a group of remote islands in the South Pacific, many military aircraft disappeared without trace — so many, if fact, that the area became known as the “New Guinea Triangle”.

When R.A.F. Flight Lieutenant Jon Day, and his C.O., Squadron Leader Richard Gibson, became embroiled in the mystery, they discovered that their dangerous foe was on the ground as well as in the air.

The Englishmen would have to improvise and use their wits to survive — even if that meant using captured weapons to bat away enemy grenades!

Story: Steve Coombs  Art: Morahin  Cover: Janek Matysiak

 


Eagle In The Sun — Commando No 4918 – 

Comm_4918_coverMaster

In the air war over Russia Anton Pozetski found life dangerous and confusing. It was easy to identify the enemy — they were the Germans and they shot at you. However, it wasn’t so easy to identify your friends. For a start, the Political Commissar and the Squadron Commander were apt to stab you in the back and they regarded the RAF as enemies.

Life was going to prove even more difficult for Anton when he joined an RAF squadron on active service.

Introduction

All of our artists are very versatile and capable of drawing any subject. However, even after five decades, Ian Kennedy is still usually our first port of call whenever we need an aeronautical cover. So, I imagine that’s what happened back in 1991 when the then-editorial team wanted an illustration featuring a Russian Polikarpov 1-16 using its propeller to shred the tail fin of an enemy Heinkel 111 bomber. Featuring Ian’s usual dynamic style and sense of drama, this is yet another prime example of his legendary work.

Scott Montgomery, Deputy Editor

Eagle In The Sun, originally Commando No 2497 (August 1991)

Story: Ian Clark  Art: Terry Patrick  Cover: Ian Kennedy

Commando Issues 4907-4910 – published 21 April 2016

Commando Issues 4907-4910 – published 21 April 2016

 

Tough To Kill — Commando No 4707Comm_4907_coverMaster

With the German Blitzkreig in full flow, retreating British forces were headed for the evacuation at Dunkirk.

Meanwhile, Jimmy Campbell — a tough, impulsive Hurricane pilot who wasn’t so good at following orders — had ended up in the brig to teach him a lesson.

His base overrun, Jimmy was determined to fight the enemy with whatever weapon he could lay his hands on — even a cricket bat!

 

Story: David Turner  Art: Vicente Alcazar  Cover: Janek Matysiak

 


Gunboat Jim — Commando No 4908Comm_4908_coverMaster

 

 

“Gunboat Jim” was the nickname he earned in the end. But for a long time before that young Sub-Lieutenant Jim Potter was “Calamity Jim” to everyone.

He could never take the wheel of one of the high-speed flotilla’s boats without running her slap-bang into trouble.

 

 

Introduction

Our endearing eponymous character always seems to be in the wrong place at the wrong time and doesn’t have much luck. Therefore, he is seen as a “Jonah” — a jinx on the high seas.

One particularly obnoxious fellow crewman is convinced that poor Jim Potter will bring down their ship but, since Jim is a true Commando hero, we know that he is made of sterner stuff.

This is a solid, entertaining sea tale, nicely drawn by Sostres.

Scott Montgomery, Deputy Editor

Gunboat Jim, originally Commando No 213 (May 1966)

Story: Clegg  Art: Sostres  Cover: Buccheri

 


Escape Or Death — Commando No 4909Comm_4909_coverMaster

 

Captain Jon Laker and Lieutenant Rodney Smythe-Simmons were stuck in a remote P.O.W. camp in desolate Poland. Both came from aristocratic families and this made them viable candidates for an important Nazi prisoner exchange operation.

However, when the chance to escape unexpectedly came their way both men knew they had to seize it…or die trying.

 

Story: George Low  Art: Jaume Forns  Cover: Ian Kennedy

 


 The Long Chase — Commando No 4910Comm_4910_coverMaster

The Sunderland hurtled in like an avenging angel and two depth charges fell from beneath her wings. Seconds later two explosions signalled the end of the U-boat beneath her. Flight-Lieutenant Jack Gregory and his crew were jubilant, for the weary months of training and patrolling had paid off.

But they wouldn’t have been so happy had they known this was only the start of a long chase that would take them the length and breadth of a snow-covered Hebridean island…on foot!

 

Introduction

This is a fantastic air, land and sea story. I love it when Commando combines all three basic genre types and The Long Chase is a master class in doing so with complete success.

The remote Hebridean island here is an excellent, imposing setting for an adventure tale that never lets up. There’s a great script by Bill Fear, a dynamic cover by Ian Kennedy and fellow veteran interior artist Gordon Livingstone delivers stunning page after page, all rendered in his trademark style.

Scott Montgomery, Deputy Editor

The Long Chase, originally Commando No 1210, (March 1978), re-issued as No 2515 (November 1991)

Story: Bill Fear  Art: Gordon Livingstone  Cover: Ian Kennedy

Commando Issues 4903-4906 – On Sale 6 April 2016

   

Commando Issues 4903-4906 – On Sale 6 April 2016

 

Web Of Fire — Commando No 4903

Comm_4903_coverMaster

 

In early 1945 the skies above Dresden burned brightly with the fire of an almighty Allied bombing raid that would go down in history.

Unfortunately for “Jelly” Jakes of the Convict Commandos, he happened to be on a secret mission in the heart of the German city that fateful night when all hell broke loose.

If he managed to survive the relentless bombardment he would also have to contend with a blast from the Commandos’ past.

 

Story: Alan Hebden  Art: Manuel Benet  Cover: Manuel Benet

 


King Of The Spits — Commando No 4904Comm_4904_coverMaster

 

The letter read:

“I, Count Ernst Von Steiger, the Red Arrow challenge the leader of this squadron to a personal duel at noon tomorrow. I shall be waiting at 16,000 feet at British Map Ref. 481609.”

And just before noon a lone Spitfire took off. At the controls was young Mike Carson, the pilot they called…KING OF THE SPITS

 

Introduction

Here is a genuine Commando classic. It has got everything that we need: great story, fantastic art and an eye-catching cover.

This solid aerial tale is brimming with action but not at the expense of the characters, all of whom are distinctive and memorable. Our stoic English hero is in charge of a tough Aussie squadron based in North Africa, but it is their charismatic German adversary who, in my opinion, steals the show…

Scott Montgomery, Deputy Editor

King Of The Spits, originally Commando No 238 (November 1966), re-issued as No 899 (January 1975)

Story: Wallace  Art: Gordon Livingstone  Cover: Ken Barr

 


Action Africa! — Commando No 4905Comm_4905_coverMaster

During World War I, Lieutenant Trevor Waite was an infantry officer posted to the colony of British East Africa. Somehow he found himself serving as part of a boat squadron. Although no sailor, he was compelled to do his duty and prove his worth to the obnoxious C.O. who was convinced that Trevor was a coward.

Although Trevor’s vessels were sturdy, reliable dhows, it looked like they might have met their match in the Germans’ superior Type 1885 torpedo boats…

 

Story: George Low  Art: Carlos Pino  Cover: Carlos Pino

 


Fighting Return — Commando No 4906Comm_4906_coverMaster

 

The traffic and the marching men were all heading in one direction…away from the advancing Germans and towards the port of Dunkirk. Only there did the retreating British troops have a chance of being evacuated to England.

However, one truck was heading the other way and it was not by mistake. Two British soldiers and a middle-aged bank manager were staging their own…FIGHTING RETURN

 

Introduction

A trio of veteran Commando creators bring you this great tale of courage and determination in the face of adversity. Writer Cyril Walker’s script has a refreshing twist where our main characters have strong reasons for heading away from the beach at Dunkirk rather than towards it.

Another old hand is interior artist C.T. Rigby who illustrates with his usual aplomb, while the equally reliable Jeff Bevan’s cover is wonderfully dynamic as well as dramatic.

Scott Montgomery, Deputy Editor

Fighting Return, originally Commando No 2477 (June 1991)

Story: C.G. Walker  Art: C.T. Rigby  Cover: Jeff Bevan

 

Commando — By Special Request

Twice a year a pair of Commando issues are chosen from suggestions sent in by readers. The latest “By Special Request” numbers are included in issues 4883-4886 – On Sale 28 January 2016 (UK). All the back cover blurbs read like classic stories from British War Comics. One of these stories is particularly special as it features a cover with an unusually stylised treatment by Ian Kennedy and some beautiful inside art by Cam (no relation) Kennedy.

 


Old Rusty — Commando No 4883

Comm_4883_coverMaster_small.jpg

Dick Avery was a captain in the Merchant Navy. He’d sailed with some of the best — and worst — ships and crews on the seven seas. He reckoned he’d seen it all.

That was before he took command of Old Rusty, an ancient tub with a crew made up of drunks, brawlers and raw seamen of every nationality.

When Dick left Gibraltar he didn’t fancy his chances of ever seeing England again.

But then they ran into a German U-boat, and he wouldn’t have swapped that ship or that crew for the best in the Royal Navy!

 

Introduction

Although veteran artist Ian Kennedy is renowned for his superlative aircraft (and spacecraft) illustration, this cover shows that, naturally enough, he is equally adept at drawing ships and submarines too.

This behemoth of a painting really sets the scene for the wonderful maritime adventure that follows. For me, it’s like The Dirty Dozen at Sea — chock full of memorable characters and action set pieces.

Many thanks to reader Yasmin Akbar for suggesting that Old Rusty should set sail once more.

Scott Montgomery, Deputy Editor

Old Rusty, originally Commando No 708 (January 1973)

Story: Powell  Art: Gordon Livingstone  Cover: Ian Kennedy

Preview: http://www.commandocomics.com/latest-issues/28th-january-2016-collection?issue=4883

 


The Wreckers — Commando No 4884

Comm_4884_coverMaster_small.jpg

Young Naval lieutenant Dan Blain teamed up with Kang Wu and his cut-throat pirates of the Java Seas to wage all-out war on the warships of Japan. When this pair of modern buccaneers got going, not a single Japanese sailor ashore or afloat could sleep soundly.

 

 

 

 

Introduction

I can almost imagine the pitch for this back in 1966 — “Pirate Commandos”…that’s definitely a winner…

Actually, I’m cheating a little (okay, a lot) — a glance at the trusty Commando records file told me that author Spence’s original working title was indeed “Pirate Commandos”.

However, I do think that the then-current editorial team made the right decision to go with the snappy, more foreboding “The Wreckers”. It really seems to suit this tough, sea-faring tale and Scholler’s menacing, murky cover illustration.

Scott Montgomery, Deputy Editor

The Wreckers, originally Commando No 212 (May 1966)

Story: Spence  Art: Alonso  Cover: Scholler

Preview: http://www.commandocomics.com/latest-issues/28th-january-2016-collection?issue=4884

 


The Black Eagle  Commando No 4885

Comm_4885_coverMaster_small

Major Heinrich Keil of the Luftwaffe was an ace…and a killer. A mad, evil Nazi whose chief delight was to hunt and kill, whether he was chasing animals on the ground or British pilots in the air.

Now he was going after another British pilot — but this time he was going to hunt him down in the forest…with a crossbow.

 

 

 

Introduction

One of the best things about working on Commando is uncovering fantastic stories from our archive, one that now spans 55 years.

I’d never read this tale as it was published in March 1972, two months before I was born. When I saw that the interior art was by the brilliant Cam Kennedy, whose 2000AD work I had admired in the 1980s, and then realised that it was a fantastic revenge yarn anyway, I knew that we just had to let another audience discover this absolute classic, which features a truly memorable villain in Major Heinrich Keil.

My sincere thanks to reader Roger Worsley, who suggested that we uncage The Black Eagle once again.

Scott Montgomery, Deputy Editor

The Black Eagle, originally Commando No 629 (March 1972), re-issued as No 1732 (September 1983)

Story: C.G. Walker  Art: Cam Kennedy  Cover: Ian Kennedy

Preview: http://www.commandocomics.com/latest-issues/28th-january-2016-collection?issue=4885

 


The Wrong Enemy — Commando No 4886

Comm_4886_coverMaster_small.jpg

The Italians fighting in North Africa clashed not only with their British foes, but also with their German allies.

Enzo Lanzini certainly wasn’t happy facing the advance of British armour across the desert, but he certainly was no coward either. It was just that he had seen the way the Nazis operated, and he had come to the conclusion that he was in fact fighting…

…THE WRONG ENEMY

 

 

Introduction

Although a Commando comic must have a solid military premise and plenty of action — at its heart, more important than anything else, it must have a strong lead character. Here we have exactly that.

Corporal Enzo Lanzini is a machine-gunner with a strong moral compass and, since he is Italian, is traditionally seen as the enemy. Right away he has the potential to become a leftfield, classic Commando hero. I hope you enjoy his story.

Scott Montgomery, Deputy Editor

The Wrong Enemy, originally Commando No 2474 (May 1991)

Story: Ian Clark  Art: Keith Shone Cover: Keith Shone

Preview: http://www.commandocomics.com/latest-issues/28th-january-2016-collection?issue=4886