Tag Archives: Eric Hebden

Commando Issues 4963-4966 – On Sale 3rd November 2016

Commando Issues 4963-4966 – On Sale 3rd November 2016

 

Deadly Dilemma — Commando No 4963 

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Stranded in Nazi-occupied France, his regiment gunned down, Corporal Bruce Newell is a hunted man. But when he comes face to face with ruthless S.S. Major Erich Benzler – the man who slaughtered Bruce’s friends in the chaos of Dunkirk – Bruce’s mission is no longer one of escape, but of revenge.

As Bruce closes in on his target, he realises his task is a heavy one… is the death of one despotic Nazi worth the lives of hundreds of innocent civilians?

Bruce is truly caught in a…

DEADLY DILEMMA!

Story: George Low  Art: Rezzonico  Cover: Janek Matysiak

 


Yankee Buddy — Commando No 4964 

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When one lone Commando was transferred to the U.S Marines, every eye was on him from the moment they hit the Japanese-held beaches. How was his shooting? How was his nerve? Did he know this stuff? Every bullet-lashed yard was a testing ground for Commando Jacky Dean, who carried the proud reputation of all the Commandos on one broad pair of shoulders.

Jacky might never have passed that test, if he hadn’t found a real buddy amongst the Yanks.

Story: Eric Hebden  Art: J. Fuente  Cover: Cortiella

Introduction

Who’s the tougher – US Marines or British Commandos?

That’s the question on everyone’s lips except our reluctant Commando, Jacky Dean. In a story by legendary Eric Hebden, Jacky is a liar, a deserter and even possibly… a murderer. Hebden pushes the boundaries of what we would consider a Commando hero while J. Fuente’s impeccable interior art cleverly depicts Jacky as a loveable rogue.

Set on the backdrop of the war in the Pacific, the plot rests on Jacky’s chaotic nature and unwillingness to fight ultimately being overcome through his friendship with his ‘Yankee Buddy’, Marine Andy Devlin. Enjoy!

The Commando Team

Yankee Buddy, originally Commando No 204 (March 1966)


 

Black Sun Squadron — Commando No 4965

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Squadron Leader Marko Vida was a talented and fiercely fascist pilot. Backed by the Nazis, Vida and his Black Sun Squadron dominated the skies over Croatia…

…Or so they thought. A Partisan Air Force made up of old, stolen fighters and led by Flight Officer Zlatan Pavic and Flying Officer Petar Milic would not hand over Croatia so easily.

With their planes outclassed and outgunned, things were fraught for the Partisan Air Force. They dared to fight back against the might of the…

BLACK SUN SQUADRON!

Story: Steve Coombs  Art: Carlos Pino  Cover: Carlos Pino

 


The Invaders — Commando No 4966

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More than two thousand years before, the Roman legions had marched into North Africa as invaders, as conquerors. In the twentieth century the soldiers of Italy returned again, and among them was one man who thought himself the equal of the ancient emperors. But he was wrong, for the ancient Romans got the better of him – in their own sinister way…

 

 

Story: C.G. Walker  Art: Llops  Cover: Ian Kennedy

Introduction

From prolific Commando writer C.G. Walker comes this classic tale of obsession, cruelty and survival, set against the stark backdrops of a brutal desert in North Africa and a fierce volcano in Italy. The drama of the story is matched perfectly in the art by fantastic interior artist Llops, who brings the action to life.

The story plays on the tension between past and present, and veteran cover artist Ian Kennedy rises to the challenge with an eye-catching and striking cover, despite his professed dislike of painting horses!

The Commando Team

The Invaders, originally Commando No 1101 (February 1977), reissued as No 2435 (January 1991).

 

 

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Commando Issues 4959-4962 – On Sale 20th October 2016

Commando Issues 4959-4962 – On Sale 20th October 2016

 

Home Front Terror — Commando No 4959

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Wounded on a daring operation in Occupied Norway, Commando Sergeant Jeff Tain was sent home to England to recuperate.

Jeff’s younger brother, Dave, was a police constable, investigating a black market racket when dead bodies unexpectedly started showing up.

The siblings were convinced that something more sinister was going on… an assassination plot involving German spies!

Story: George Low  Art: Morahin  Cover: Janek Matysiak

 


Blood Of Heroes — Commando No 4960

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Sergeant Butch Walker was a veteran with 30 years of fighting service in the British Army – and now they said he was too old to fight.

Boy soldier Jimmy Walker, Butch’s nephew, had barely one year of square-bashing to his credit. They said he was too young to fight.

But no matter how hard they tried, nobody could keep those two away from the front line for long. For in the veins of both ran the blood of heroes.

 

Story: Eric Hebden  Art: Segrelles  Cover: James

Introduction

The impressive art of Vicente Segrelles [more likely his cousin Eustaquio] appeared in fifteen Commando books, beginning with “Desert Fury” (No 232) and ending with “Silence The Guns!” (No 1454). All were published between 1966 and 1980.

A Spaniard, his interior work had a dramatic, fluid style with plenty of thick, black inks. Señor Segrelles also handled some Commando covers – although not on this occasion, that equally impressive piece of art was done by the mysterious ‘James’.

Scott Montgomery, Deputy Editor

Blood Of Heroes, originally Commando No 259 (May 1967), re-issued as No 915 (March 1975)

 


The Stone Forest — Commando No 4961

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Clarke Johnson was a reconnaissance pilot during America’s clash with Mexico in the early 20th Century. His aircraft grounded, Clarke found himself in an uneasy alliance with an Apache-born former U.S. Cavalryman and together they were fighting Pancho Villa’s Mexican revolutionaries.

Things looked bleak – as bleak as the eerie burial site that hid a treasure that men were willing to kill for. They would have to fight to survive and uncover the secret of…

The Stone Forest!

Story: Steve Coombs  Art: Keith Page  Cover: Keith Page

 


Raid By Night! — Commando No 4962

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Tactics had changed, machines had improved, but Group Captain Roland Bird knew from his Great War experiences that efficiency came with practice and attention to detail. His new command could expect a hard taskmaster, especially the crew of Wellington S-Sugar, who had crashed his car at their first meeting.

 

 

Story: Ian Clark  Art: Terry Patrick  Cover: Ian Kennedy

Introduction

Regular Commando readers know that Ian Kennedy is renowned for his legendary aircraft covers – although, of course, he can draw anything and everything. Ian himself has a passion for aeronautical illustration that has become his trademark and he has drawn over 1000 Commando covers.

His painting here is of a slightly more esoteric plane than we’re used to – a Handley Page 400, which was flown by pilots in the newly-formed Royal Air Force, as well as the Royal Naval Air Service late in World War I. The image may not be of something as immediately recognisable as a Wellington or a Lancaster but we still have that sense of drama and dynamism inherent in this amazing artist’s work.

Scott Montgomery, Deputy Editor

Raid By Night!, originally Commando No 2461 (April 1991)

 

 

Nostalgia IS What It Used to Be

They say nostalgia isn’t what it used to be, but I beg to differ.

I started reading Commando in the late 60s and, along with The Victor, it was my regular comics reading. Oh, sure, I read others — too many to list — but nowhere near as regularly. After a long-ish break, I came back to Commando in the 90s and was pleased to see that, although it had moved on in story treatments — no Roman legionaries or science-fiction spacemen in the 60s! — it was, essentially, in the same place as before.

Now it’s the “last man standing,” it’s the only theatre to find my heroes from back in the day. No, not the servicemen, but the artists and writers whose work filled my boyhood hours and whose names I now know for sure. These issues — 4887-4890 on Sale 11th February 2016 (UK) — prove the point. Where else would you find Victor De La Fuente’s artwork alongside Ian Kennedy’s, Carlos Pino’s and Ken Barr’s? Or stories by “The Major” Eric Hebden and Commando‘s former editor George Low?

The new boys are good but for unqualified nostalgia you can’t beat the old school — even if you are reading on an iPad.

 


 

Out Of Time — Commando No 4887

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It seemed that the Grossin brothers couldn’t be more different.

Marc was a mild-mannered watchmaker — the occupying German garrison had used his skills to mend various timepieces dotted around their base.

Meanwhile, his younger brother, Bernard, was a member of the local French Resistance and he had begun to wonder if Marc was getting too friendly with the Nazis.

That was the least of Bernard’s worries, though. During a shoot-out at a ruined churchyard, he wondered if he was finally…

…OUT OF TIME

Story: George Low  Art: Rezzonico  Cover: Janek Matysiak

Preview: http://www.commandocomics.com/latest-issues/11th-february-2016-collection?issue=4887


 

Codeword – “Torch” — Commando No 4888

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One man held the key to the operation called by the codeword — “TORCH” — the huge Allied invasion of North Africa. His name was Pete Macrory, a Canadian in the Royal Engineers — and nobody trusted him an inch.

To find out why, and what made Pete tick in his own peculiar way, you had to go way back to General Wolfe’s attack on Quebec in 1759. That’s when a distant ancestor of Pete’s, young Jock Macrory, was involved in a deadly adventure of his own…

 

Introduction

I don’t think I’ll be spoiling things for you, as there is a big clue in the title, when I reveal that this story features Operation “Torch” — the real life British/American invasion of French North Africa in the winter of 1942.

However, people often mistake Commando for some kind of history book but this is not the case. Although we use authentic military events as a backdrop (and strive not to be wildly inaccurate regarding their use), we will always have fictional principal characters placed among them, ensuring that the stories are works of the imagination, with scope for action and adventure.

Scott Montgomery, Deputy Editor

Codeword – “Torch”, originally Commando No 220 (July 1966), re-issued as No 859 (August 1974)

Story: Eric Hebden  Art: Victor De La Fuente  Cover: Ken Barr

Preview: http://www.commandocomics.com/latest-issues/11th-february-2016-collection?issue=4888

 


 

Polish Pride — Commando No 4889

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When their unit was wiped out in the Blitzkrieg that heralded the beginning of World War II, Lieutenant Bartek Abramski and Sergeant Jakub Brejnak reluctantly found themselves on the run from the Germans.

These proud Uhlan cavalrymen were determined to survive and live to continue their fight another day. As time wore on, though, the chances of this seemed increasingly slim. However, when they teamed up with a downed pilot, a fellow Pole, it looked like they might have a chance to escape the clutches of the enemy…

 

Story: George Low  Art: Carlos Pino  Cover: Carlos Pino

Preview: http://www.commandocomics.com/latest-issues/11th-february-2016-collection?issue=4889

 


Dive And Kill! — Commando No 4890

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It took nerves of steel to survive in the deadly skies over war-torn Europe…Pilot Officer Chris Bennet had proved that. Or so his fellow pilots thought. They reckoned he was the bravest guy they knew.

But even steel can break, and so could Chris…

 

 

 

Introduction

I reckon we could call this story a “bromance” — even though it was published long before that particular word came into widespread, everyday use.

Its main focus is on the friendship between two pals — who have known each other since their university days — and how they cope with the tumultuous pressures of being RAF pilots at the height of the Battle of Britain and beyond.

Naturally, both men are very different. David Gouldie’s quiet introspection is a neat counterpoint to Chris Bennet’s dashing showmanship — but it seems that he really is putting on a show…

Scott Montgomery, Deputy Editor

Dive And Kill!, originally Commando No 2470 (May 1991)

Story: Ian Clark  Art: Terry Patrick  Cover: Ian Kennedy

Preview: http://www.commandocomics.com/latest-issues/11th-february-2016-collection?issue=4890