Tag Archives: Cyril Walker

Commando Issues 4963-4966 – On Sale 3rd November 2016

Commando Issues 4963-4966 – On Sale 3rd November 2016

 

Deadly Dilemma — Commando No 4963 

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Stranded in Nazi-occupied France, his regiment gunned down, Corporal Bruce Newell is a hunted man. But when he comes face to face with ruthless S.S. Major Erich Benzler – the man who slaughtered Bruce’s friends in the chaos of Dunkirk – Bruce’s mission is no longer one of escape, but of revenge.

As Bruce closes in on his target, he realises his task is a heavy one… is the death of one despotic Nazi worth the lives of hundreds of innocent civilians?

Bruce is truly caught in a…

DEADLY DILEMMA!

Story: George Low  Art: Rezzonico  Cover: Janek Matysiak

 


Yankee Buddy — Commando No 4964 

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When one lone Commando was transferred to the U.S Marines, every eye was on him from the moment they hit the Japanese-held beaches. How was his shooting? How was his nerve? Did he know this stuff? Every bullet-lashed yard was a testing ground for Commando Jacky Dean, who carried the proud reputation of all the Commandos on one broad pair of shoulders.

Jacky might never have passed that test, if he hadn’t found a real buddy amongst the Yanks.

Story: Eric Hebden  Art: J. Fuente  Cover: Cortiella

Introduction

Who’s the tougher – US Marines or British Commandos?

That’s the question on everyone’s lips except our reluctant Commando, Jacky Dean. In a story by legendary Eric Hebden, Jacky is a liar, a deserter and even possibly… a murderer. Hebden pushes the boundaries of what we would consider a Commando hero while J. Fuente’s impeccable interior art cleverly depicts Jacky as a loveable rogue.

Set on the backdrop of the war in the Pacific, the plot rests on Jacky’s chaotic nature and unwillingness to fight ultimately being overcome through his friendship with his ‘Yankee Buddy’, Marine Andy Devlin. Enjoy!

The Commando Team

Yankee Buddy, originally Commando No 204 (March 1966)


 

Black Sun Squadron — Commando No 4965

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Squadron Leader Marko Vida was a talented and fiercely fascist pilot. Backed by the Nazis, Vida and his Black Sun Squadron dominated the skies over Croatia…

…Or so they thought. A Partisan Air Force made up of old, stolen fighters and led by Flight Officer Zlatan Pavic and Flying Officer Petar Milic would not hand over Croatia so easily.

With their planes outclassed and outgunned, things were fraught for the Partisan Air Force. They dared to fight back against the might of the…

BLACK SUN SQUADRON!

Story: Steve Coombs  Art: Carlos Pino  Cover: Carlos Pino

 


The Invaders — Commando No 4966

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More than two thousand years before, the Roman legions had marched into North Africa as invaders, as conquerors. In the twentieth century the soldiers of Italy returned again, and among them was one man who thought himself the equal of the ancient emperors. But he was wrong, for the ancient Romans got the better of him – in their own sinister way…

 

 

Story: C.G. Walker  Art: Llops  Cover: Ian Kennedy

Introduction

From prolific Commando writer C.G. Walker comes this classic tale of obsession, cruelty and survival, set against the stark backdrops of a brutal desert in North Africa and a fierce volcano in Italy. The drama of the story is matched perfectly in the art by fantastic interior artist Llops, who brings the action to life.

The story plays on the tension between past and present, and veteran cover artist Ian Kennedy rises to the challenge with an eye-catching and striking cover, despite his professed dislike of painting horses!

The Commando Team

The Invaders, originally Commando No 1101 (February 1977), reissued as No 2435 (January 1991).

 

 

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Commando Issues 4951-4954 – On Sale 22 September 2016

Commando Issues 4951-4954 – On Sale 22 September 2016

 

Battle of the Black Crow — Commando No 4951

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The Black Crow was a pirate ship, sailing the seas south of Cuba and tussling with Navy vessels from many different countries.

Two young crewmen, Flinn Scott and Charlie Reeves, longed to jump ship — as they missed their Scottish homeland so much. However, soon came the chance to get their hands on some treasure — but they were not the only buccaneers interested. The Tartarus, a British privateer ship and its captain would destroy anyone who got in their way of their haul.

Story: Ferg Handley  Art: Keith Page  Cover: Keith Page

 


Atlantic Killer — Commando No 4952

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A swift trail of bubbles — if you see it and a roar like a thousand express trains crashing — if you hear it. That’s all the warning you get when a torpedo hits home.

Lieutenant Commander Dave Miller lost his destroyer just like that to Kapitan Karl von Sturm, top Nazi U-Boat ace known as the “Sea Wolf”. The way things were going, Dave was liable to lose another ship…unless he got to the “Sea Wolf” first.

 

 

Introduction

This is a tough, sea-faring tale which has a personal vendetta between two arch enemies at its heart. Veteran interior artist C.T. Rigby draws maritime action incredibly well — his thick lines are almost like the inky depths of the Atlantic itself and are wonderfully atmospheric, especially whenever a U-Boat is submerged.

The late, sadly-missed Ken Barr also provides a dynamic cover illustration which does its job perfectly — giving the reader a solid indication of the action contained within the book’s pages.

Scott Montgomery, Deputy Editor

Atlantic Killer, originally Commando No 260 (May 1967)

Story: Newark  Art: C.T. Rigby  Cover: Ken Barr

 


For The White Eagle! — Commando No 4953

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The Order of the White Eagle was Poland’s highest military decoration. Captain Janusz Libarcki wore his medal with pride as he fought the Red Army and the Germans during World War II, even though he eventually became a prisoner-of-war.

However, when Germany turned against her Russian allies, Polish prisoners such as Janusz and his lieutenant, Lech Szost, became conscripts of the Red Army on the horrific Eastern Front. It seemed that their brutal Russian officer despised them as much as he did the Nazis. Nonetheless, the Poles were determined to honour their fallen comrades and their homeland…

FOR THE WHITE EAGLE!

Story: Philip Madden  Art: Rezzonico/Morahin   Cover: Janek Matysiak

 


 Deadly Triangle — Commando No 4954

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Shooting up unsuspecting British trucks in a captured Hurricane was just one of the dirty tricks played by Erich von Werner – a pilot hated by his own men as much as by the British.

The feeling was mutual, particularly for Luftwaffe pilot Carl Lutz and Ted Bull of the RAF – two men linked by fate to Werner to form a strange and deadly triangle.

 

 

Introduction

This rollicking air story sets a fair pace and I’m sure it might hold a record for the number of times that any of our three main characters have to abandon their aircraft and bail out after a dogfight. It’s just as well that interior artist José Maria Jorge was such a master of aerial action; I imagine that this script would have been tailored specifically for him. His attention to detail was astounding and many other Commando artists were huge fans of his wonderful work.

The same can, of course, be said about our equally legendary cover artist, Ian Kennedy – who delivers yet another action-packed, dynamic illustration.

Scott Montgomery, Deputy Editor

Deadly Triangle, originally Commando No 2466 (April 1991)

Story: C.G. Walker  Art: J.M. Jorge  Cover: Ian Kennedy

Commando Issues 4931-4934 – On Sale 14 July 2016

Commando Issues 4931-4934 – On Sale 14 July 2016

 

Mark Of The Lion — Commando No 4931Comm_4931_coverMaster

 

Sergeant Bill Marsh seemed to bear a charmed life — or so his men said. Time after time he missed death by a hair’s breadth. What his men didn’t know was that Bill had been told by an African witch-doctor that he would be killed by a lion — and there weren’t any lions in France.

Or were there? Nobody could foresee the monster which Bill would soon have to face.

 

Introduction

Only in Commando can you begin with a framing device that takes on the form of a mystical African curse, which then encompasses the retreat at Dunkirk via the development of a top secret, prototype enemy super-tank. Meanwhile, our hero thinks that he is invincible ever since he is cursed to be killed by a lion — and that seems unlikely in France.

All of these plot threads are expertly woven into a fantastic script by veteran author C.G. Walker, with great art by C.T. Rigby and a wonderful montage cover by Ian Kennedy.

My thanks to reader Bob Whalley for suggesting that we revisit this gem of a story from yesteryear.

Scott Montgomery, Deputy Editor

Mark Of The Lion, originally Commando No 608 (December 1971)

Story: C.G. Walker  Art: C.T. Rigby  Cover: Ian Kennedy


The Lost Army — Commando No 4932Comm_4932_coverMaster

 

Strange things happen in the African desert — especially in the “Region of Devils”. But these three lost L.R.D.G. soldiers had never seen anything as weird as this…being helped in their desperate mission by Persian soldiers straight from the pages of history 2000 years ago.

“Prof”, Jack and Duncan didn’t know whether to be glad — or just plain terrified!

 

Introduction

Courtesy of interior artist Jose De La Fuente, this book is full of stunning imagery— of a lost Persian army from 525 B.C. seemingly returned to fight in the arid desert of North Africa in World War II.

However, one of my favourite sequences is much more straightforward but still typically dynamic — on page nine, one of our Long Range Desert Group heroes manages to bring down a Stuka dive-bomber armed only with a Thompson sub-machine gun. Fantastic stuff, and there’s a great cover from the sadly-missed Ken Barr too.

Scott Montgomery, Deputy Editor

The Lost Army, originally Commando No 222 (July 1966), re-issued as No 867 (September 1974)

Story: Skentelberry  Art: J. Fuente  Cover: Ken Barr

 


Night Intruder — Commando No 4933Comm_4933_coverMaster

Pete Owen was a fine pilot in a Mosquito night-fighter squadron, with a growing number of kills to his name.

Then he shook everybody by flying his plane, complete with the latest top-secret radar, across the Channel into German hands. He’d been playing a traitor’s game all the time, it seemed.

But why was he now in a German prison camp? And why was he spending every minute planning an escape? All he’d get in Britain would be a firing squad.

Introduction

This air/espionage/Prisoner-Of-War genre-twisting yarn is wonderfully illustrated by Repetto. He drew five Commandos book — of which this was the second — but over a short, if fairly prolific, period between November 1967 and March 1969. It’s a pity he didn’t do any more, as his line work is detailed and dynamic, and his night scenes are very atmospheric. And the late Ken Barr wraps it all up with a typically dramatic cover.

My thanks to reader Geir-Erik Nicolaysen for suggesting that we revisit this classic.

Scott Montgomery, Deputy Editor

Night Intruder, originally Commando No 307 (January 1968), re-issued as No 1011 (March 1976)

Story: McOwan  Art: Repetto  Cover: Ken Barr

 


Reluctant Assassin — Commando No 4934Comm_4934_coverMaster

 

The order was simple — “Kill Mackheim”. The reason was also simple — he was a masterful German general who could thwart the Allied advance in this region of Italy.

Captain Harry Brown, a skilled assassin, was already in the area, operating with the partisans. He was the obvious choice for the job, but there was one snag — he had lost the will to kill in cold blood…

 

Introduction

Alan Hebden is a name familiar to UK comic fans. Incredibly inventive, his scripts appeared in the likes of Battle and 2000AD in their 1970s glory days and beyond.

Alan’s first Commando credit was “Night Of Fear” (No 984, November 1975) and he has continued writing for us ever since. Indeed, the author’s popular, long-running “Convict Commandos” series will continue in the near future.

This story, however, shows how Alan can take what might initially appear to be a straightforward premise but he puts his own, unique spin on it in terms of characters and plot. So, just what would happen to a killer who lost his killer instinct…? Read on and find out.

Scott Montgomery, Deputy Editor

Reluctant Assassin, originally Commando No 2481 (June 1991)

Story: Alan Hebden  Art: Salmeron  Cover: Mike Cox

Happy Birthday…

…to the UK’s most prodigious and last surviving war story title. Born on 27th June 1961 Commando remains basically unchanged. Basically but not completely. The paper is better, there’s more colour, the Commando nameplate has been modified; there’s even a new typeface. It’s what hasn’t changed that’s important to me, though. The stories are still well thought-out and generally have a moral (in the loosest sense) in them. The characters remain well drawn and the plots properly thought through.

I don’t know about another 55 years (I won’t be around) but I’ll raise a glass tonight and another when the old warhorse gets to 5,000 issues. Less than a year now.

Issues numbered 4927-4930 go on Sale in the UK on 30th June 2016.


Survive The Somme — Commando No 4927Comm_4927_coverMaster

Private Joe Dugdale was one of many men thrust into the heart of a battle which would go on to be remembered as the most horrific of all time.

When the Battle of the Somme commenced in July 1916, no-one could have known it would drag on for five months and that there would be an eventual death toll of over one million.

Although Joe bravely faced the hell of the trenches every day, he was unaware that his Sergeant held a grudge and wanted rid of him for good.

It looked unlikely that Joe would…

SURVIVE THE SOMME

Story: Richard Davis  Art: Rezzonico  Cover: Ian Kennedy

 


Phantom Frogmen — Commando No 4928

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Corporal Stan Norton and Sergeant Ted Clark — Commandos, frogmen, mates.

But the ruthless Commando rule — if a man gets hurt, he gets left behind, whoever he is — looked like splitting them.

Ted was lying hurt in a well-guarded German army hospital. Stan was on his own in an enemy-occupied city.

But Stan said to blazes with the Commando rules. Ted was in there and he was just naturally going in to get him out.

Introduction

This is tough Special Forces story. A “men-on-a-mission” classic, it is superbly drawn by Rodrigo, especially when, naturally enough, the action goes underwater. His thick, dark inks really give the impression of the murky depths of the ocean and the eerie final resting place of a downed Lysander aircraft.

However, once we get back on to dry land we are straight into all-guns-blazing mode for a Commando tale that never lets up until the final page.

Scott Montgomery, Deputy Editor

Phantom Frogmen, originally Commando No 233 (October 1966), re-issued as No 871 (September 1974)

Story: Redbridge  Art: Rodrigo  Cover: Segrelles

 


Biplane Alley — Commando No 4929Comm_4929_coverMaster

Tom Wills was desperate for adventure and wanted to be a pilot during World War II. Unfortunately, his flying skills were not up to scratch and he ended up as a clerk in the Pay Corps.

However, he seized upon the opportunity to join a ragtag group of flyers led by a maverick World War I veteran. Major Richard Joyce used ancient biplanes from the Great War to harass German and Italian forces in the North African desert. In their Gypsy Moth planes, armed only with long-fused bombs and Webley revolvers, Tom and his comrades literally went under the radar on these daring night raids against the enemy.

Story: David Heptonstall  Art: Keith Page  Cover: Keith Page

 


Revenge Of The Shadow — Commando No 4930

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The mysterious hooded figure hiding in the undergrowth was intent on vengeance — against SS Colonel Hans Meyer and his pack of “Wolves”.

He had already killed several of them silently and swiftly with his crossbow. Now if he could get inside the house, the evil leader of the wolf-pack would only have a few more moments to live…

 

Introduction

I do enjoy it when a Commando tale begins in one genre and swiftly changes tack. In this case, we appear to have a traditional air story featuring a couple of plucky Lancaster pilots but it immediately morphs into a taut Resistance piece set in occupied France.

Top class script, interior and cover work all come seamlessly together here for a memorable action story with a little bit of mystery thrown in, too.

Scott Montgomery, Deputy Editor

Revenge Of The Shadow, originally Commando No 1126 (May 1977), re-issued as No 2452 (March 1991)

Story: Cyril Walker  Art: Ibanez  Cover: Ian Kennedy

 

Commando Issues 4903-4906 – On Sale 6 April 2016

   

Commando Issues 4903-4906 – On Sale 6 April 2016

 

Web Of Fire — Commando No 4903

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In early 1945 the skies above Dresden burned brightly with the fire of an almighty Allied bombing raid that would go down in history.

Unfortunately for “Jelly” Jakes of the Convict Commandos, he happened to be on a secret mission in the heart of the German city that fateful night when all hell broke loose.

If he managed to survive the relentless bombardment he would also have to contend with a blast from the Commandos’ past.

 

Story: Alan Hebden  Art: Manuel Benet  Cover: Manuel Benet

 


King Of The Spits — Commando No 4904Comm_4904_coverMaster

 

The letter read:

“I, Count Ernst Von Steiger, the Red Arrow challenge the leader of this squadron to a personal duel at noon tomorrow. I shall be waiting at 16,000 feet at British Map Ref. 481609.”

And just before noon a lone Spitfire took off. At the controls was young Mike Carson, the pilot they called…KING OF THE SPITS

 

Introduction

Here is a genuine Commando classic. It has got everything that we need: great story, fantastic art and an eye-catching cover.

This solid aerial tale is brimming with action but not at the expense of the characters, all of whom are distinctive and memorable. Our stoic English hero is in charge of a tough Aussie squadron based in North Africa, but it is their charismatic German adversary who, in my opinion, steals the show…

Scott Montgomery, Deputy Editor

King Of The Spits, originally Commando No 238 (November 1966), re-issued as No 899 (January 1975)

Story: Wallace  Art: Gordon Livingstone  Cover: Ken Barr

 


Action Africa! — Commando No 4905Comm_4905_coverMaster

During World War I, Lieutenant Trevor Waite was an infantry officer posted to the colony of British East Africa. Somehow he found himself serving as part of a boat squadron. Although no sailor, he was compelled to do his duty and prove his worth to the obnoxious C.O. who was convinced that Trevor was a coward.

Although Trevor’s vessels were sturdy, reliable dhows, it looked like they might have met their match in the Germans’ superior Type 1885 torpedo boats…

 

Story: George Low  Art: Carlos Pino  Cover: Carlos Pino

 


Fighting Return — Commando No 4906Comm_4906_coverMaster

 

The traffic and the marching men were all heading in one direction…away from the advancing Germans and towards the port of Dunkirk. Only there did the retreating British troops have a chance of being evacuated to England.

However, one truck was heading the other way and it was not by mistake. Two British soldiers and a middle-aged bank manager were staging their own…FIGHTING RETURN

 

Introduction

A trio of veteran Commando creators bring you this great tale of courage and determination in the face of adversity. Writer Cyril Walker’s script has a refreshing twist where our main characters have strong reasons for heading away from the beach at Dunkirk rather than towards it.

Another old hand is interior artist C.T. Rigby who illustrates with his usual aplomb, while the equally reliable Jeff Bevan’s cover is wonderfully dynamic as well as dramatic.

Scott Montgomery, Deputy Editor

Fighting Return, originally Commando No 2477 (June 1991)

Story: C.G. Walker  Art: C.T. Rigby  Cover: Jeff Bevan

 

Wet And Dry (But Mainly Wet)

There’s a distinctly watery feel to this latest batch of Commando stories (Issues 4899-4902 – On Sale 24th March 2016 in the UK). Until you get to the last one where the Phil Gascoine’s dusty khaki-coloured cover leaves you in no doubt that this is a waterless waste.

But that’s not what struck me most. Not for the first time, this selection illustrates (ho ho) the freedom that the war comic allows the writer when it comes to locations. This bunch have two in the Far East, one in Northern India and a fourth in Greece. Okay so a writer could put their characters in any one of these locations but, given the global nature of war from the 19th Century on, that writer doesn’t have to make up any reason for their characters to be there beyond the Services sending them. And that allows characters the reader can readily identify with, both culturally and physically. And that allows them to identify with the experience of the players is the story.

That identification is of a totally different kind to that experienced when reading of the adventures of another spandex-covered super and lay at the core of most British war comics. The difference between the superhero and the everyman hero.

No prizes for guessing my preference.


Massacre In Malaya — Commando No 4899

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In the arid jungles of Malaya in 1941, British and Commonwealth forces held out against the relentless advance of the Japanese.

Private Josh Combe and his unit were determined to protect the life of a civilian boy who had been left silent, traumatised and alone by the murderous actions of a pair of enemy officers.

In a last-ditch attempt to get to friendly territory they would have to take to the river to survive.

 

 

Story: George Low Art: Olivera/Rodriguez Cover: Janek Matysiak

Preview: Massacre In Malaya


Sailor With Wings — Commando No 4900

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Lieutenant-Commander Jim Treggaron, pilot in the Fleet Air Arm, had the blood of the old Cornish pirates in his veins — or so his men said. Otherwise, he’d never have tried to organise his Swordfish squadron to operate from a little beach in Greece. They were supposed to fly from their aircraft carrier.

However, Jim found a bunch of tough Resistance helpers, a cave full of old RAF fuel and ammo, and a beach long enough for take-off.

The Italian navy was in handy range so zooming into action went the

SAILOR WITH WINGS

Introduction

Peter Ford is undoubtedly one of Commando’s unsung heroes from the earliest days of the title — and is a rare example of an excellent artist who was also a great scriptwriter. In terms of art, one of his specialties was aircraft illustration. Even from the first, dynamic page opposite it is apparent that we’re in for an action-packed, aeronautical treat.

Buccheri’s cover is superb too — although one does wonder if Peter Ford had hankered to supply the cover too and make this book a creative Commando hat-trick!

Scott Montgomery, Deputy Editor

Sailor With Wings, originally Commando No 239 (December 1966)

Story: Peter Ford Art: Peter Ford Cover: Buccheri

PreviewSailor With Wings


 

Full Steam Ahead — Commando No 4901

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So, just how did two downed Royal Australian Air Force pilots end up on a secluded Pacific island — as prisoners of a long-forgotten Imperial German Navy unit whose unhinged leader was determined to complete a decades-old mission?

Sergeant Matt Herford and Corporal Ben MacAuley would have to commandeer an ancient, steam-powered torpedo boat in an attempt to escape and warn their superiors of an imminent threat.

It’s a tall tale indeed, fantastic in every sense of the word.

 

 

Story: Stephen Walsh Art: Keith Page Cover: Keith Page

PreviewFull Steam Ahead

 


 

Branded A Coward — Commando No 4902

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The heroic last stand of Lieutenant Hugh Overton in the mountains of the Indian North-West Frontier won even the respect of the enemy tribesmen who had wiped out his patrol to a man.

Yet by his own people Hugh was branded a coward, a deserter who had fled in terror in the face of the enemy, condemning his men to death!

 

Introduction

At first glance you might think that this book has several overly familiar traits that you might expect to find in a Commando story.

An officer wrongly accused of cowardice. Check.

An object – in this instance a silver cigar case – which serves as an important plot-point, or “macguffin“, according to film director Alfred Hitchcock. Check.

A relative of the accused who is determined to find out the truth. Check.

However, thanks to the conviction of all the creators involved, it all still works — no matter how superficially familiar the tropes of the tale itself may seem.

Scott Montgomery, Deputy Editor

Branded A Coward, originally Commando No 2440 (January 1991)

Story: C.G. Walker Art: Keith Shone Cover: Phil Gascoine

Preview: Branded A Coward

Commando — By Special Request

Twice a year a pair of Commando issues are chosen from suggestions sent in by readers. The latest “By Special Request” numbers are included in issues 4883-4886 – On Sale 28 January 2016 (UK). All the back cover blurbs read like classic stories from British War Comics. One of these stories is particularly special as it features a cover with an unusually stylised treatment by Ian Kennedy and some beautiful inside art by Cam (no relation) Kennedy.

 


Old Rusty — Commando No 4883

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Dick Avery was a captain in the Merchant Navy. He’d sailed with some of the best — and worst — ships and crews on the seven seas. He reckoned he’d seen it all.

That was before he took command of Old Rusty, an ancient tub with a crew made up of drunks, brawlers and raw seamen of every nationality.

When Dick left Gibraltar he didn’t fancy his chances of ever seeing England again.

But then they ran into a German U-boat, and he wouldn’t have swapped that ship or that crew for the best in the Royal Navy!

 

Introduction

Although veteran artist Ian Kennedy is renowned for his superlative aircraft (and spacecraft) illustration, this cover shows that, naturally enough, he is equally adept at drawing ships and submarines too.

This behemoth of a painting really sets the scene for the wonderful maritime adventure that follows. For me, it’s like The Dirty Dozen at Sea — chock full of memorable characters and action set pieces.

Many thanks to reader Yasmin Akbar for suggesting that Old Rusty should set sail once more.

Scott Montgomery, Deputy Editor

Old Rusty, originally Commando No 708 (January 1973)

Story: Powell  Art: Gordon Livingstone  Cover: Ian Kennedy

Preview: http://www.commandocomics.com/latest-issues/28th-january-2016-collection?issue=4883

 


The Wreckers — Commando No 4884

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Young Naval lieutenant Dan Blain teamed up with Kang Wu and his cut-throat pirates of the Java Seas to wage all-out war on the warships of Japan. When this pair of modern buccaneers got going, not a single Japanese sailor ashore or afloat could sleep soundly.

 

 

 

 

Introduction

I can almost imagine the pitch for this back in 1966 — “Pirate Commandos”…that’s definitely a winner…

Actually, I’m cheating a little (okay, a lot) — a glance at the trusty Commando records file told me that author Spence’s original working title was indeed “Pirate Commandos”.

However, I do think that the then-current editorial team made the right decision to go with the snappy, more foreboding “The Wreckers”. It really seems to suit this tough, sea-faring tale and Scholler’s menacing, murky cover illustration.

Scott Montgomery, Deputy Editor

The Wreckers, originally Commando No 212 (May 1966)

Story: Spence  Art: Alonso  Cover: Scholler

Preview: http://www.commandocomics.com/latest-issues/28th-january-2016-collection?issue=4884

 


The Black Eagle  Commando No 4885

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Major Heinrich Keil of the Luftwaffe was an ace…and a killer. A mad, evil Nazi whose chief delight was to hunt and kill, whether he was chasing animals on the ground or British pilots in the air.

Now he was going after another British pilot — but this time he was going to hunt him down in the forest…with a crossbow.

 

 

 

Introduction

One of the best things about working on Commando is uncovering fantastic stories from our archive, one that now spans 55 years.

I’d never read this tale as it was published in March 1972, two months before I was born. When I saw that the interior art was by the brilliant Cam Kennedy, whose 2000AD work I had admired in the 1980s, and then realised that it was a fantastic revenge yarn anyway, I knew that we just had to let another audience discover this absolute classic, which features a truly memorable villain in Major Heinrich Keil.

My sincere thanks to reader Roger Worsley, who suggested that we uncage The Black Eagle once again.

Scott Montgomery, Deputy Editor

The Black Eagle, originally Commando No 629 (March 1972), re-issued as No 1732 (September 1983)

Story: C.G. Walker  Art: Cam Kennedy  Cover: Ian Kennedy

Preview: http://www.commandocomics.com/latest-issues/28th-january-2016-collection?issue=4885

 


The Wrong Enemy — Commando No 4886

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The Italians fighting in North Africa clashed not only with their British foes, but also with their German allies.

Enzo Lanzini certainly wasn’t happy facing the advance of British armour across the desert, but he certainly was no coward either. It was just that he had seen the way the Nazis operated, and he had come to the conclusion that he was in fact fighting…

…THE WRONG ENEMY

 

 

Introduction

Although a Commando comic must have a solid military premise and plenty of action — at its heart, more important than anything else, it must have a strong lead character. Here we have exactly that.

Corporal Enzo Lanzini is a machine-gunner with a strong moral compass and, since he is Italian, is traditionally seen as the enemy. Right away he has the potential to become a leftfield, classic Commando hero. I hope you enjoy his story.

Scott Montgomery, Deputy Editor

The Wrong Enemy, originally Commando No 2474 (May 1991)

Story: Ian Clark  Art: Keith Shone Cover: Keith Shone

Preview: http://www.commandocomics.com/latest-issues/28th-january-2016-collection?issue=4886