Tag Archives: Clegg

Commando Issues 4911-4914 – On Sale 5 May 2016

Commando Issues 4911-4914 – On Sale 5 May 2016

 

Codename “Magpie” — Commando No 4911Comm_4911_coverMaster

Captain Eric Brunt was a secret agent. His codename was “Magpie” — because he stole and hoarded vital enemy intelligence in the way that the bird allegedly hoarded anything that glittered.

When a Royal Navy Motor Torpedo Boat poised to pick up Eric was destroyed, the spy was trapped in occupied France, alongside Frank Nelson, a fellow survivor from the boat. Frank blamed Eric for the loss of his crew and ship. Now both men would have to work together to escape the clutches of the dreaded Gestapo.

Story: George Low  Art: Keith Page  Cover: Keith Page

 


Rogue Pilot — Commando No 4912 Comm_4912_coverMaster

Sergeant Pilot Tim Cooney was a real happy-go-lucky chap. Some said he was just plain careless. Nothing really bothered him or took the grin off his face — nothing, that is, until he discovered the Germans testing a new and terrifying glider bomb.

However, when Tim made his report, no one would believe him. They thought it was just another of his jokes. It looked like he’d have to do something about this threat himself…

 

Introduction

Our thoughts are with the family of artist Ken Barr, who died in March. Ken painted the very first Commando cover, “Walk – Or Die!” back in June 1961. Indeed, he illustrated a further thirteen consecutive covers straight after. The majority of his 175 covers appeared over a prolific ten-year period until April 1971.

After a few rare appearances in the mid-1990s, a decade after this, Ken contacted then-Editor Calum Laird to ask if he could contribute a new cover. Of course, we jumped at the chance and the result was “Blood Red Battle” (No 4138), published in September 2008.

Our thanks and respect to this huge talent, who played a pivotal part in Commando’s 55-year history.

Scott Montgomery, Deputy Editor

Rogue Pilot, Originally Commando No 219 (July 1966), re-issued as No 875 (October 1974)

Story: Clegg  Art: Peter Ford  Cover: Ken Barr

 


Sawdust Commandos — Commando No 4913Comm_4913_coverMaster

The men of the Canadian Forestry Corps were known as the “Sawdust Fusiliers” — trained soldiers, they were also lumberjacks based in Great Britain during World War II.

In a remote area of the Scottish Highlands a group of Commandos on a training exercise clashed with the Canadians.

However, the Green Berets and the Fusiliers expectedly came up against a group of invading German Navy Marines who were on a top secret mission. These “Sawdust Commandos” would have to put aside their differences and fight for their very lives.

Story: George Low  Art: Muller  Cover: Janek Matysiak

 


Trouble All The Way — Commando No 4914Comm_4914_coverMaster

A Royal Navy destroyer is a formidable fighting unit — fast, well-armed and deadly. So when Pete Brandon was posted to join one in Rangoon, he was delighted. But what happened? Instead of joining the destroyer, he found himself on a little HDML — a Harbour Defence Motor Launch!

Well, he didn’t know it then, but this was the start of the adventure of his life. Things really started to get really dangerous when his boat was attacked by a Japanese Zero floatplane — and the danger kept on coming.

Introduction

Ian Kennedy’s dramatic cover certainly sets up “Trouble All The Way” as a sea and air story, but fairly quickly it changes into a tense jungle tale. Our Royal Navy hero, Sub-Lieutenant Pete Brandon, finds himself unhappily on land and in the middle of a guerrilla skirmish in occupied Burma.

It’s exciting stuff from veteran writer R.A. Montague, ably drawn by interior artist, Mira — those bats on the opposite page look terrific, I think.

Scott Montgomery, Deputy Editor

Trouble All The Way, originally No 1122 (April 1977), re-issued as 2459 (April 1991)

Story: R.A. Montague  Art: Mira  Cover: Ian Kennedy

 

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Commando Issues 4907-4910 – published 21 April 2016

Commando Issues 4907-4910 – published 21 April 2016

 

Tough To Kill — Commando No 4707Comm_4907_coverMaster

With the German Blitzkreig in full flow, retreating British forces were headed for the evacuation at Dunkirk.

Meanwhile, Jimmy Campbell — a tough, impulsive Hurricane pilot who wasn’t so good at following orders — had ended up in the brig to teach him a lesson.

His base overrun, Jimmy was determined to fight the enemy with whatever weapon he could lay his hands on — even a cricket bat!

 

Story: David Turner  Art: Vicente Alcazar  Cover: Janek Matysiak

 


Gunboat Jim — Commando No 4908Comm_4908_coverMaster

 

 

“Gunboat Jim” was the nickname he earned in the end. But for a long time before that young Sub-Lieutenant Jim Potter was “Calamity Jim” to everyone.

He could never take the wheel of one of the high-speed flotilla’s boats without running her slap-bang into trouble.

 

 

Introduction

Our endearing eponymous character always seems to be in the wrong place at the wrong time and doesn’t have much luck. Therefore, he is seen as a “Jonah” — a jinx on the high seas.

One particularly obnoxious fellow crewman is convinced that poor Jim Potter will bring down their ship but, since Jim is a true Commando hero, we know that he is made of sterner stuff.

This is a solid, entertaining sea tale, nicely drawn by Sostres.

Scott Montgomery, Deputy Editor

Gunboat Jim, originally Commando No 213 (May 1966)

Story: Clegg  Art: Sostres  Cover: Buccheri

 


Escape Or Death — Commando No 4909Comm_4909_coverMaster

 

Captain Jon Laker and Lieutenant Rodney Smythe-Simmons were stuck in a remote P.O.W. camp in desolate Poland. Both came from aristocratic families and this made them viable candidates for an important Nazi prisoner exchange operation.

However, when the chance to escape unexpectedly came their way both men knew they had to seize it…or die trying.

 

Story: George Low  Art: Jaume Forns  Cover: Ian Kennedy

 


 The Long Chase — Commando No 4910Comm_4910_coverMaster

The Sunderland hurtled in like an avenging angel and two depth charges fell from beneath her wings. Seconds later two explosions signalled the end of the U-boat beneath her. Flight-Lieutenant Jack Gregory and his crew were jubilant, for the weary months of training and patrolling had paid off.

But they wouldn’t have been so happy had they known this was only the start of a long chase that would take them the length and breadth of a snow-covered Hebridean island…on foot!

 

Introduction

This is a fantastic air, land and sea story. I love it when Commando combines all three basic genre types and The Long Chase is a master class in doing so with complete success.

The remote Hebridean island here is an excellent, imposing setting for an adventure tale that never lets up. There’s a great script by Bill Fear, a dynamic cover by Ian Kennedy and fellow veteran interior artist Gordon Livingstone delivers stunning page after page, all rendered in his trademark style.

Scott Montgomery, Deputy Editor

The Long Chase, originally Commando No 1210, (March 1978), re-issued as No 2515 (November 1991)

Story: Bill Fear  Art: Gordon Livingstone  Cover: Ian Kennedy