Tag Archives: C.T. Rigby

Commando Issues 4967-4970 – On Sale 17th November 2016

Commando Issues 4967-4970 – On Sale 17th November 2016

 

Goulash Grenadiers — Commando No 4967

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Wrong time, wrong place and wrong soldiers. Mistaken for SAS, Abe, Cyril and Mike were in trouble. Being captured behind enemy lines was a nightmare for any British Soldier. But these men weren’t just any kind of soldiers…they were cooks.

Pressed working alongside Wehrmacht cooks, Abe, Cyril and Mike were left in a sticky situation. Tensions were close to boiling point until the power of Yorkshire puddings helped six men, enemies by war, become friends in catering.

Story: George Low  Art: Keith Page  Cover: Keith Page

 


Hoodoo Ship — Commando No 4968

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At long last, Sub-lieutenant Roy Palmer and merchant captain Brian Miller had found the island supply base from which U-boat packs slipped anchor to attack Allied convoys in the South Atlantic.

But, only after they’d been adrift for days with two boatloadas of tired, unarmed men. They didn’t even have a radio to pass on the vital news.

What could they do? Not much at all it seemed, until Roy found an ancient cannon and remembered a tale about red hot cannonballs…

Story: Powell  Art: C.T. Rigby  Cover: Ken Barr

Introduction

Powell’s thrilling storytelling, coupled with the unusual title of this issue, makes Hoodoo Ship an exciting and rambunctious read!

Playing on the classic trope of a suspicious seaman, Powell invokes the tense atmosphere of a ship with more than a little hoodoo going on. Objects go missing, the boilers are sabotaged and the crew is attacked by an unseen, ghostly assailant…or so it seems.

The star of the script is Powell’s perfect villain, Oberleutnant Franz Von Reitz. He’s unforgiving, merciless and calculating – everything you love to hate in a Commando villain. He keeps our hero on his toes and makes Hoodoo Ship a truly bewitching book!

The Commando Team

Hoodoo Ship, originally Commando No 255 (April 1967)

 


Yuri: On the Run — Commando No 4969

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Yuri Murayev, ex-Spetznaz Commando, thought that his troubles were behind him. But he hadn’t reckoned on Anatoly Speck, the sinister Russian billionaire who had made it his business to destroy the former commando.

Framed for murder, and on the run, Yuri finds himself in a deadly cat and mouse game, wanted by both the Russian underworld and his old friends in the SAS. With bullets flying, and the casualties mounting, it’s up to Yuri to clear his name before it’s too late!

Story: Stephen Walsh  Art: Manuel Benet  Cover: Manuel Benet

 


The Diamond Smugglers — Commando No 4970

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When you want an agent to penetrate an enemy-occupied country and stay free long enough to do a tricky job, you ned someone who’s used to getting around without attracting attention. Who better than a man who smuggled diamonds in and out of that very country for years?

But there’s a difference between peace-time and war. Before, the worst that could happen to him was to be put in jail. Now, if he was caught, he faced certain death!

 

Story: Bernard Gregg  Art: Llops  Cover: Ian Kennedy

Introduction

This brilliant adventure follows two friends divided and reunited by war and adversary shapes us, and is brought to life with stunning visuals by classic interior artist, Llops. For our heroes, Jan and Tom, the Second World War offers them a restored friendship, and a renewed sense of heroism and purpose. For ferocious Nazi officer Driebrick (another brilliantly drawn, snarling Commando villain), however, the war is a gateway to greater treachery.

Add to this thrilling rivalry and riveting artwork, another atmospheric cover from master artist Ian Kennedy, and you have a recipe for a truly gripping yarn!

The Commando Team

The Diamond Smugglers, originally Commando No 1138 (June 1977), reissued as No 2468 (May 1991)

 

 

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Commando Issues 4955-4958 – On Sale 6th October 2016

Commando Issues 4955-4958 – On Sale 6th October 2016

 

Midnight Mission — Commando No 4955

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Flight Sergeant Nick Nolan was a reliable, thoughtful type. He yearned to fly a fighter like a Spitfire or Hurricane but his superiors reckoned he “didn’t have enough fire in his belly”.

Nonetheless, he undoubtedly had skills so Nick was selected to transport secret agents and supplies into German-held France. Aboard his Westland Lysander, the pilot never knew what dangers might spring from the darkness – dangers like a marauding Junkers 88 Night-fighter out for the kill!

Story: George Low  Art: Vicente Alcazar  Cover: Ian Kennedy

 


Fortress Of Fear — Commando No 4956

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“Subito! Quickly! Across the road, no noise, no lights — the German lorries come. In them are the captured British Commandos sent to blow up the secret arsenal beneath Castello Santuzzo.

“These men are trained to do what we can never hope to. They must be freed and aided. Who knows, it might be that in return they will make sure that at least one Commando knife slips into the black heart of Kommandant Von Schneider.

“He has tortured and killed too many of us. His time has come. We, the mountain men of the Italian resistance, will make it so.

“So quickly, quietly…”

Story: Spence  Art: Quesada  Cover: Segrelles

Introduction

In order to fight a Nazi threat, a squad of British Commandos form an uneasy alliance with a ragged resistance group hiding in the Italian hills.

What’s different about this book is that the back cover blurb is written in the first person – from the point of view of one of the resistance men. It’s quite a rare occurrence but is certainly effective in conveying immediate drama – and I’m surprised that Commando hasn’t done this kind of thing more often.

Scott Montgomery, Deputy Editor

Fortress Of Fear, originally Commando No 261 (May 1967), re-issued as No 931 (May 1977)

 


Yuri’s Return — Commando No 4957

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Yuri Muryavev, a retired “Shock Force” Spetznaz Commando, had settled in the UK but, after the collapse of communism, he returned to his Russian homeland. Wishing to do honest work, he took on a job offer to provide security for an aid agency operating in South America.

However, Yuri did not realise that he was in the employ of Anatoly Speck, a sinister Russian billionaire who had plans to wreak havoc upon the world.

Now the former soldier faced a danger even greater than ever before and only he could stop it…

Story: Stephen Walsh  Art: Manuel Benet  Cover: Manuel Benet

 


The Pony Soldiers — Commando No 4958

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Horses against tanks and aircraft? Not a recipe for success, you’d think. But that was the best that was available for a gallant band of guerrillas – men and boys – battling against the Japanese in the Philippine Islands… as they waited for the Americans to return and set them free.

 

 

Story: Ian Clark  Art: C.T. Rigby  Cover: Phil Gascoine

Introduction

We’ve been very fortunate throughout Commando’s 55-year history that our versatile artists can draw anything – from tanks to battleships, aircraft to infantry. But, unlikely as it sounds, a few artists have told us that horses are a challenge to draw well.

As a non-artist myself, I’m not sure why this might be – presumably the amount of detail required to render each beast must be very time-consuming. So I can only imagine how an illustrator might shudder when they read scripts with words like: “A horde of cavalry riders storm across a crowded battlefield…”

However, as you will see, veteran Commando stalwarts C. T. Rigby and Phil Gascoine have risen to the occasion.

Scott Montgomery, Deputy Editor

The Pony Soldiers, originally Commando No 2457 (March 1991)

Commando Issues 4951-4954 – On Sale 22 September 2016

Commando Issues 4951-4954 – On Sale 22 September 2016

 

Battle of the Black Crow — Commando No 4951

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The Black Crow was a pirate ship, sailing the seas south of Cuba and tussling with Navy vessels from many different countries.

Two young crewmen, Flinn Scott and Charlie Reeves, longed to jump ship — as they missed their Scottish homeland so much. However, soon came the chance to get their hands on some treasure — but they were not the only buccaneers interested. The Tartarus, a British privateer ship and its captain would destroy anyone who got in their way of their haul.

Story: Ferg Handley  Art: Keith Page  Cover: Keith Page

 


Atlantic Killer — Commando No 4952

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A swift trail of bubbles — if you see it and a roar like a thousand express trains crashing — if you hear it. That’s all the warning you get when a torpedo hits home.

Lieutenant Commander Dave Miller lost his destroyer just like that to Kapitan Karl von Sturm, top Nazi U-Boat ace known as the “Sea Wolf”. The way things were going, Dave was liable to lose another ship…unless he got to the “Sea Wolf” first.

 

 

Introduction

This is a tough, sea-faring tale which has a personal vendetta between two arch enemies at its heart. Veteran interior artist C.T. Rigby draws maritime action incredibly well — his thick lines are almost like the inky depths of the Atlantic itself and are wonderfully atmospheric, especially whenever a U-Boat is submerged.

The late, sadly-missed Ken Barr also provides a dynamic cover illustration which does its job perfectly — giving the reader a solid indication of the action contained within the book’s pages.

Scott Montgomery, Deputy Editor

Atlantic Killer, originally Commando No 260 (May 1967)

Story: Newark  Art: C.T. Rigby  Cover: Ken Barr

 


For The White Eagle! — Commando No 4953

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The Order of the White Eagle was Poland’s highest military decoration. Captain Janusz Libarcki wore his medal with pride as he fought the Red Army and the Germans during World War II, even though he eventually became a prisoner-of-war.

However, when Germany turned against her Russian allies, Polish prisoners such as Janusz and his lieutenant, Lech Szost, became conscripts of the Red Army on the horrific Eastern Front. It seemed that their brutal Russian officer despised them as much as he did the Nazis. Nonetheless, the Poles were determined to honour their fallen comrades and their homeland…

FOR THE WHITE EAGLE!

Story: Philip Madden  Art: Rezzonico/Morahin   Cover: Janek Matysiak

 


 Deadly Triangle — Commando No 4954

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Shooting up unsuspecting British trucks in a captured Hurricane was just one of the dirty tricks played by Erich von Werner – a pilot hated by his own men as much as by the British.

The feeling was mutual, particularly for Luftwaffe pilot Carl Lutz and Ted Bull of the RAF – two men linked by fate to Werner to form a strange and deadly triangle.

 

 

Introduction

This rollicking air story sets a fair pace and I’m sure it might hold a record for the number of times that any of our three main characters have to abandon their aircraft and bail out after a dogfight. It’s just as well that interior artist José Maria Jorge was such a master of aerial action; I imagine that this script would have been tailored specifically for him. His attention to detail was astounding and many other Commando artists were huge fans of his wonderful work.

The same can, of course, be said about our equally legendary cover artist, Ian Kennedy – who delivers yet another action-packed, dynamic illustration.

Scott Montgomery, Deputy Editor

Deadly Triangle, originally Commando No 2466 (April 1991)

Story: C.G. Walker  Art: J.M. Jorge  Cover: Ian Kennedy

Commando Issues 4931-4934 – On Sale 14 July 2016

Commando Issues 4931-4934 – On Sale 14 July 2016

 

Mark Of The Lion — Commando No 4931Comm_4931_coverMaster

 

Sergeant Bill Marsh seemed to bear a charmed life — or so his men said. Time after time he missed death by a hair’s breadth. What his men didn’t know was that Bill had been told by an African witch-doctor that he would be killed by a lion — and there weren’t any lions in France.

Or were there? Nobody could foresee the monster which Bill would soon have to face.

 

Introduction

Only in Commando can you begin with a framing device that takes on the form of a mystical African curse, which then encompasses the retreat at Dunkirk via the development of a top secret, prototype enemy super-tank. Meanwhile, our hero thinks that he is invincible ever since he is cursed to be killed by a lion — and that seems unlikely in France.

All of these plot threads are expertly woven into a fantastic script by veteran author C.G. Walker, with great art by C.T. Rigby and a wonderful montage cover by Ian Kennedy.

My thanks to reader Bob Whalley for suggesting that we revisit this gem of a story from yesteryear.

Scott Montgomery, Deputy Editor

Mark Of The Lion, originally Commando No 608 (December 1971)

Story: C.G. Walker  Art: C.T. Rigby  Cover: Ian Kennedy


The Lost Army — Commando No 4932Comm_4932_coverMaster

 

Strange things happen in the African desert — especially in the “Region of Devils”. But these three lost L.R.D.G. soldiers had never seen anything as weird as this…being helped in their desperate mission by Persian soldiers straight from the pages of history 2000 years ago.

“Prof”, Jack and Duncan didn’t know whether to be glad — or just plain terrified!

 

Introduction

Courtesy of interior artist Jose De La Fuente, this book is full of stunning imagery— of a lost Persian army from 525 B.C. seemingly returned to fight in the arid desert of North Africa in World War II.

However, one of my favourite sequences is much more straightforward but still typically dynamic — on page nine, one of our Long Range Desert Group heroes manages to bring down a Stuka dive-bomber armed only with a Thompson sub-machine gun. Fantastic stuff, and there’s a great cover from the sadly-missed Ken Barr too.

Scott Montgomery, Deputy Editor

The Lost Army, originally Commando No 222 (July 1966), re-issued as No 867 (September 1974)

Story: Skentelberry  Art: J. Fuente  Cover: Ken Barr

 


Night Intruder — Commando No 4933Comm_4933_coverMaster

Pete Owen was a fine pilot in a Mosquito night-fighter squadron, with a growing number of kills to his name.

Then he shook everybody by flying his plane, complete with the latest top-secret radar, across the Channel into German hands. He’d been playing a traitor’s game all the time, it seemed.

But why was he now in a German prison camp? And why was he spending every minute planning an escape? All he’d get in Britain would be a firing squad.

Introduction

This air/espionage/Prisoner-Of-War genre-twisting yarn is wonderfully illustrated by Repetto. He drew five Commandos book — of which this was the second — but over a short, if fairly prolific, period between November 1967 and March 1969. It’s a pity he didn’t do any more, as his line work is detailed and dynamic, and his night scenes are very atmospheric. And the late Ken Barr wraps it all up with a typically dramatic cover.

My thanks to reader Geir-Erik Nicolaysen for suggesting that we revisit this classic.

Scott Montgomery, Deputy Editor

Night Intruder, originally Commando No 307 (January 1968), re-issued as No 1011 (March 1976)

Story: McOwan  Art: Repetto  Cover: Ken Barr

 


Reluctant Assassin — Commando No 4934Comm_4934_coverMaster

 

The order was simple — “Kill Mackheim”. The reason was also simple — he was a masterful German general who could thwart the Allied advance in this region of Italy.

Captain Harry Brown, a skilled assassin, was already in the area, operating with the partisans. He was the obvious choice for the job, but there was one snag — he had lost the will to kill in cold blood…

 

Introduction

Alan Hebden is a name familiar to UK comic fans. Incredibly inventive, his scripts appeared in the likes of Battle and 2000AD in their 1970s glory days and beyond.

Alan’s first Commando credit was “Night Of Fear” (No 984, November 1975) and he has continued writing for us ever since. Indeed, the author’s popular, long-running “Convict Commandos” series will continue in the near future.

This story, however, shows how Alan can take what might initially appear to be a straightforward premise but he puts his own, unique spin on it in terms of characters and plot. So, just what would happen to a killer who lost his killer instinct…? Read on and find out.

Scott Montgomery, Deputy Editor

Reluctant Assassin, originally Commando No 2481 (June 1991)

Story: Alan Hebden  Art: Salmeron  Cover: Mike Cox

Commando Issues 4903-4906 – On Sale 6 April 2016

   

Commando Issues 4903-4906 – On Sale 6 April 2016

 

Web Of Fire — Commando No 4903

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In early 1945 the skies above Dresden burned brightly with the fire of an almighty Allied bombing raid that would go down in history.

Unfortunately for “Jelly” Jakes of the Convict Commandos, he happened to be on a secret mission in the heart of the German city that fateful night when all hell broke loose.

If he managed to survive the relentless bombardment he would also have to contend with a blast from the Commandos’ past.

 

Story: Alan Hebden  Art: Manuel Benet  Cover: Manuel Benet

 


King Of The Spits — Commando No 4904Comm_4904_coverMaster

 

The letter read:

“I, Count Ernst Von Steiger, the Red Arrow challenge the leader of this squadron to a personal duel at noon tomorrow. I shall be waiting at 16,000 feet at British Map Ref. 481609.”

And just before noon a lone Spitfire took off. At the controls was young Mike Carson, the pilot they called…KING OF THE SPITS

 

Introduction

Here is a genuine Commando classic. It has got everything that we need: great story, fantastic art and an eye-catching cover.

This solid aerial tale is brimming with action but not at the expense of the characters, all of whom are distinctive and memorable. Our stoic English hero is in charge of a tough Aussie squadron based in North Africa, but it is their charismatic German adversary who, in my opinion, steals the show…

Scott Montgomery, Deputy Editor

King Of The Spits, originally Commando No 238 (November 1966), re-issued as No 899 (January 1975)

Story: Wallace  Art: Gordon Livingstone  Cover: Ken Barr

 


Action Africa! — Commando No 4905Comm_4905_coverMaster

During World War I, Lieutenant Trevor Waite was an infantry officer posted to the colony of British East Africa. Somehow he found himself serving as part of a boat squadron. Although no sailor, he was compelled to do his duty and prove his worth to the obnoxious C.O. who was convinced that Trevor was a coward.

Although Trevor’s vessels were sturdy, reliable dhows, it looked like they might have met their match in the Germans’ superior Type 1885 torpedo boats…

 

Story: George Low  Art: Carlos Pino  Cover: Carlos Pino

 


Fighting Return — Commando No 4906Comm_4906_coverMaster

 

The traffic and the marching men were all heading in one direction…away from the advancing Germans and towards the port of Dunkirk. Only there did the retreating British troops have a chance of being evacuated to England.

However, one truck was heading the other way and it was not by mistake. Two British soldiers and a middle-aged bank manager were staging their own…FIGHTING RETURN

 

Introduction

A trio of veteran Commando creators bring you this great tale of courage and determination in the face of adversity. Writer Cyril Walker’s script has a refreshing twist where our main characters have strong reasons for heading away from the beach at Dunkirk rather than towards it.

Another old hand is interior artist C.T. Rigby who illustrates with his usual aplomb, while the equally reliable Jeff Bevan’s cover is wonderfully dynamic as well as dramatic.

Scott Montgomery, Deputy Editor

Fighting Return, originally Commando No 2477 (June 1991)

Story: C.G. Walker  Art: C.T. Rigby  Cover: Jeff Bevan

 

Still Going Commando…

…after 54 years. Yes, that’s right. From its first issue on 27th June 1961, Commando has provided action and adventure in a handy pocket size. Though the paper used for pages and covers got thicker around five years ago, the format has not changed and it’s none the worse for that.

The first issues of 2016 are Nos 4879 – 4882. Here’s what acting Editor Scott Montgomery had to say about them.

And by the way, the cliched “Going Commando” has been used to get it out of my system…for now!


Banquet Of Blood – Commando No 4879

Comm_4879_coverMaster_small Budapest, 1945.

Why is Doctor Jane Mallory poised to attack her cowardly colleague, “Jelly” Jakes?

The answer is at the heart of the latest mission for the Convict Commandos. They must uncover a dangerous secret which turns normal soldiers into crazed, ravenous hordes capable of killing anything — or, indeed, anyone — who gets in the way of their desire to eat.

Is this the Commandos’ most terrifying adventure yet? Jelly definitely thinks so!

Story: Alan Hebden Art: Manuel Benet Cover: Manuel Benet

Preview: http://www.commandocomics.com/latest-issues/14th-january-2016-collection?issue=4879


Showdown! – Commando No 4880

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Everybody had thought a lot of Inspector Harry Andrews of the Malayan Police. He was a real man, all guts. Pity he had been captured and probably killed by the Japanese when the invasion over-ran his outpost. He’d put up quite a fight, though.

Then, there was his brother, Colin — just a war correspondent, not a fighting soldier. He’d never be half the man Harry was, they said. Even though he got himself on a desperate mission to the district in Malaya where his brother had disappeared…but they didn’t really know Colin Andrews…

Introduction

Our premier Gold Collection title of 2016 kicks things off in spectacular style, with a reassuringly gritty jungle tale. This book is brimming with action and intrigue which never lets up.

Spence’s script is expertly drawn by Cecil Rigby with his usual aplomb, while Lopez Espi’s cover is a masterclass in pulp illustration.

I hope you enjoy this story and are looking forward to many more like it throughout the year.

Scott Montgomery, Deputy Editor

Showdown!, originally Commando No 227 (September 1966)

Story: Spence  Art: C.T. Rigby  Cover: Lopez Espi

 http://www.commandocomics.com/latest-issues/14th-january-2016-collection?issue=4880



Death Drop – Commando No 4881

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In 1944, Allied forces in Southern Italy met fierce resistance from the German defenders who fought bitterly from the cover of the mountains and hills.

When a British airborne unit were tasked with landing behind enemy lines and hampering the German escape, this seemed straightforward.

However, Captain Roy Hopkins soon found out the hard way that nothing ever went according to plan. He and his men would have to fight every step of the way if they were to complete their mission…

Story: Ferg Handley  Art: Keith Page  Cover: Keith Page

Preview: http://www.commandocomics.com/latest-issues/14th-january-2016-collection?issue=4881


 

Another Tight Spot… – Commando No 4882

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Andy Leslie had known all along that he would have to face danger when he volunteered to serve with the Parachute Regiment. That had turned out to be the way of it, Andy battling his way clear from one tight spot after another with the famous Red berets.

Nobody had ever warned him that he might end up in the sea, bobbing about in a dinghy. There was nothing predictable in any day of Andy’s war…

 

 

Introduction

Welcome to the premier Silver Collection issue of 2016.

This fast-paced tale of the continuing adventures of a Parachute Regiment soldier was drawn by the late Ricardo Garijo. Another Tight Spot was actually his first Commando book – the first of over 90 issues that he completed before his death in October 2009. His final book, The Winter Warriors (No 4257), was published posthumously in December of that year.

An exceptional talent, this influential and hugely popular Argentinian artist is much-missed to this day.

Scott Montgomery, Deputy Editor

Another Tight Spot…, originally Commando No 2469 (May 1991)

Story: Alan Hemus  Art: Ricardo Garijo  Cover: Ian Kennedy

Preview: http://www.commandocomics.com/latest-issues/14th-january-2016-collection?issue=4882