Tag Archives: Alan Hebden

Commando Issues 4995 – 4998 – On Sale 23rd February 2017

Commando Issues 4995 – 4998 – On Sale 23rd February 2017


The Village – Commando No 4995

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By spring, 1945, the Reich’s forces were in full retreat and Allied troops were pushing into Germany. So when Sergeant Matt Geary and his small squadron moved into the small village of Langhirten, he wasn’t expecting much resistance.

They took the village from the SS battalion easily and they repelled the German’s counterattack with little issue. But after the SS’s third attempt to seize back the village, Matt became suspicious. Langhirten had no strategic value and the Germans were supposed to be retreating… So what was so important about Langhirten?

What secrets were hidden in…The Village?

Story: Ferg Handley  Art: Vicente Alcazar  Cover: Janek Matysiak


Hurricane! – Commando No 4996

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Imagine a Russian squadron whose ancient biplanes have been swept out of the sky by speedy Me 109s. They’re thirsting for revenge.

Then comes along Kirk Roland with a trainload of superfast Hurricanes, ready to risk his life in teaching the Russian pilots how to hit back hard. You’d have thought they would welcome him with open arms!

But they didn’t. They hated Kirk, and his planes, from the moment he arrived.

Story: Newark  Art: Repetto  Cover: Ken Barr

 

Introduction

Prepare for take-off with another high-flying adventure from the Commando archives! Newark explores the winning, but often tense, relationship between Britain’s RAF pilots and Soviet Russia’s air force in this tale of team work. Steeped in history, Newark celebrates the collaboration between the allies, but also confronts the differing opinions held during this time. It is particularly interesting to see Soviet Russia’s female pilots (the first women pilots in the world to be allowed to fly combat missions) being represented and well-respected in this issue.

Accompanied by Repetto’s astonishing artwork, Hurricane! is a fast-paced air adventure, worthy of another outing.

The Commando Team

Hurricane!, originally Commando No. 296 (November 1967)


Hidden Nazis – Commando No 4997

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In 1945, after the German surrender, Nazis guilty of heinous war crimes attempted to flee or conceal themselves in post-war Germany. Lieutenant Sam Watling’s job was to find them.

But he had help. An unknown hand aided Sam in his quest for justice, unmarked envelopes and tips were left at his desk – behind them a secret informant.

Someone was helping Sam catch Hidden Nazis.

Story: George Low  Art: Manuel Benet  Cover: Manuel Benet

 


Jailbreak Heroes – Commando No 4998

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Three men on the run – but running into danger instead of away from it. For when ex-Sergeant Mike Stone got the chance to escape from Polworth Military Prison in England, he decided to head back to the front line in France to seek revenge on the cowardly officer who had betrayed him.

And the honest ex-Sergeant was surprised to find how glad he was when two other jailbirds, Alf Barstow and Lefty Briggs, insisted on tagging along too…

Story: Alan Hebden  Art: Keith Shone  Cover: Ian Kennedy

 

Introduction 

Nothing propels a storyline better than a personal vendetta. Forlorn and bitter, Mike Stone is desperate to clear his name after being falsely imprisoned for cowardice and striking an officer. The urgency of Veteran writer, Alan Hebden’s plot is coupled perfectly with Keith Shone’s masterful interior art.

Ian Kennedy shines once again and provides a dynamic cover illustration which does its job splendidly, framing the tone of the action contained within this Commando’s pages.

The Commando Team

Jailbreak Heroes, originally Commando No. 2493 (August 1991)

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Commando Issues 4975 – 4978 – On Sale 15th December 2016

Commando Issues 4975 – 4978 – On Sale 15th December 2016

 

Flying Blind — Commando No 4975

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Sergeant Owain Howell was too headstrong for the RAF. Charged with insubordination, he found himself consigned to the ground crew, servicing the planes he had once hoped to fly. Travelling with his crew to Africa, he was shot down and stranded in Italy.

Squadron leader Leonard Brinkley, on the other hand, was a cool and experienced pilot. However, after a raid went disastrously wrong, Leonard found himself a Prisoner of War; unable to see, and unable to escape.

Together, they embarked on an audacious plan to rescue their teammates and return to Britain. But escaping the enemy is no mean feat when you’re… Flying Blind.

Story: Alan Hebden  Art: Morahin  Cover: Janek Matysiak

 


The Stolen Lanc — Commando No 4976

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Tom Cornish flew Spitfires and had lightning reactions to match. His brother, Mike, flew a Lancaster bomber, and was as safe and steady as a rock.

Too bad that Tom had a nasty habit of referring to “flying tramcars” and “lumbering Lancs”, or saying fighter pilots needed twice the skill and courage of bomber crews. To him bombing was about as risky as delivering milk.

Mike was so mad that he invited Tom aboard the Lanc for one of those “milk runs”.

Story: David Boutland  Art: Domingo  Cover: Ken Barr

Introduction 

The introduction of the Lancaster bomber in World War Two would change the face of air warfare, bringing with it enduring competition between bomber crews and fighter pilots. Such attitudes are brilliantly explored in David Boutland’s epic tale of sibling rivalry, as he perfectly captures the frustration of fighting for recognition.

The story of Mike and Tom Cornish is brought to life by Domingo’s striking artwork, not only capturing the fast-paced action, but establishing a fraught relationship between the brothers with subtle looks and body language. Framed by Ken Barr’s stunning cover art, The Stolen Lanc recognises the importance of the Lancaster bomber crew and the incredible risks they took on each of their missions.

The Commando Team

The Stolen Lanc, originally Commando No 271 (July 1967), reissued as No 951 (July 1975).

 


Strange Encounter — Commando No 4977

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Cadogan Strange thought he’d heard the last of the arrogant Major von Hunsdorff after Russian troops had thwarted the Major’s attempt to flee across the Pamirs to the Turkish Front. But a Prisoner of War camp could not hold Hunsdorff for long, and his escape brought these two foes face to face once again.

Desperate to use Afghanistan’s forces against the British, Hunsdorff defies orders from Berlin and leads his men towards Heart in an effort to seize power. With a score to settle and peace to maintain, it is up to respected veteran Cadogan Strange and his newfound ally, Lieutenant Frank Gibson, to stop the rogue German troops from reaching their target – before it’s too late!

Story: Alan Hebden  Art: Morahin and Rezzonico  Cover: Ian Kennedy

 


The Cairo Secret — Commando No 4978

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A vast city, teeming with millions of people of all nationalities. Here in Cairo were spies, informers, saboteurs, as well as crooks, thieves, and assassins. Here many a dangerous plot was hatched, here much money could be made, and quickly. Here too, sudden death lay waiting…

 

 

 

 

Story: Lomas  Art: Gordon C. Livingstone  Cover: Ian Kennedy

Introduction 

When reluctant soldiers Len Potter and Tim Bates deserted the army to seek their fortune in Cairo, they could never have guessed that they would become central figures in sparking an uprising against the British. The Cairo Secret is a classic tale of twists and treachery, tapping into the revolutionary tensions in Egypt during the Second World War, and proving there was action – and danger – to be found far from the front lines.

Lomas’ cast of unpredictable characters teamed with Gordon Livingstone’s wonderful art creates an undercover story which throws us straight into the action, refusing to slow down until the very end.

The Commando Team

The Cairo Secret, originally Commando No 1130 (May 1977), reissued as No 2460 (April 1991)

 

 

Commando Issues 4971 – 4974 – On Sale 1st December 2016

Commando Issues 4971 – 4974 – On Sale 1st December 2016

 

Island of Last Hope — Commando No 4971  

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In 1938, Germany invaded Poland…but Poland did not give in without a fight.

Captain Micha Polanski and the Polish Air Force fought valiantly against the might of the Luftwaffe. But when his brother was slaughtered, Micha swore vengeance against the plane that cut him down, the plane that bore the symbol of a Black Eagle and Swastika.

Micha was sent to Britain to continue the fight against Nazis, but he still hoped he would see that plane again and avenge his brother. As for Micha and many other Poles, Britain was wyspa ostatniej nadziei… The Island of Last Hope.

Story: Shane Filer  Art: Muller  Cover: Ian Kennedy

 


Stringbag Ace — Commando No 4972 

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They said HMS Adventurer was a haunted ship; haunted by a shadowy figure bent on sending the carrier to the bottom with all her planes and crew.

Mystery lights flashed at night to guide enemy bombers to her. Men were struck down in shadowy corners and never knew what hit them. Guns jammed, planes blew up. Death, sudden and baffling, stalked by night along the quiet alleyways of the ship…

And a young flight lieutenant wanted to get his Spitfires and their pilots to Malta in one piece.

Story: Tyson  Art: Peter Ford  Cover: Ken Barr

Introduction

If you’re searching for an outstanding adventure then look no further than this maritime gem. Tyson contrasts the claustrophobic confines of the HMS. Adventurer with the endless vistas of the skies to create a tense tale of ships, sabotage and Stringbags.

To top it all off, this issue boasts a truly dynamic cover, courtesy of iconic and greatly missed Commando artist, Ken Barr. Set at a dizzying angle, it’s a dramatic and exhilarating depiction of aerial action.

The Commando Team

Stringbag Ace, originally Commando No 265 (June 1967), reissued as No 935 (May 1975)

 


Mountie Hunter — Commando No 4973 

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Mounties Drew Fraser and Ross McKinley were partners and best friends. But when Drew enlisted in the Canadian Army, Ross was left behind.

However, Mountie life was far from quiet for Ross as the destruction of the war in Europe had extended its deathly claw all the way to Canada. Trains and supply lines were being targeted with ruthless precision, destroying vital supplies for the Allies. So ruthless in fact it spelled only one thing – sabotage!

Hunting the German spies would push Drew to the edge and force him to make the ultimate sacrifice. But a Mountie always gets his man…

Story: Alan Hebden  Art: Vicente Alcazar  Cover: Janek Matysiak

 


Press Gang — Commando No 4974 

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Front-line action from the London blitz right through to the final American triumph against the Japanese in the Pacific. Not bad for a man invalided out of the RAF in 1940 and not even in the fighting forces.

But then RD Jones was a press photographer and he and his mate Tommy Vidler were a two-man team of war correspondents, risking death to get the news to their readers at home.

 

 

Story: Alan Hemus  Art: Manuel Benet  Cover: Ian Kennedy

Introduction

Alan Hemus’ celebration of wartime correspondents is a boyish adventure that runs the full length of the Second World War, from the London Blitz to the final days of the Pacific War.

There is a great array of characters and show-stopping set pieces, all brought to life by the dynamic pen and brushes of artist, Manuel Benet. Benet is a true Commando Comics veteran, still illustrating new issues to this day, so it’s a real treat to be able to share some of his earlier artwork – enjoy!

The Commando Team

Press Gang, originally Commando No 2479 (June 1991)

 

 

Commando Issues 4931-4934 – On Sale 14 July 2016

Commando Issues 4931-4934 – On Sale 14 July 2016

 

Mark Of The Lion — Commando No 4931Comm_4931_coverMaster

 

Sergeant Bill Marsh seemed to bear a charmed life — or so his men said. Time after time he missed death by a hair’s breadth. What his men didn’t know was that Bill had been told by an African witch-doctor that he would be killed by a lion — and there weren’t any lions in France.

Or were there? Nobody could foresee the monster which Bill would soon have to face.

 

Introduction

Only in Commando can you begin with a framing device that takes on the form of a mystical African curse, which then encompasses the retreat at Dunkirk via the development of a top secret, prototype enemy super-tank. Meanwhile, our hero thinks that he is invincible ever since he is cursed to be killed by a lion — and that seems unlikely in France.

All of these plot threads are expertly woven into a fantastic script by veteran author C.G. Walker, with great art by C.T. Rigby and a wonderful montage cover by Ian Kennedy.

My thanks to reader Bob Whalley for suggesting that we revisit this gem of a story from yesteryear.

Scott Montgomery, Deputy Editor

Mark Of The Lion, originally Commando No 608 (December 1971)

Story: C.G. Walker  Art: C.T. Rigby  Cover: Ian Kennedy


The Lost Army — Commando No 4932Comm_4932_coverMaster

 

Strange things happen in the African desert — especially in the “Region of Devils”. But these three lost L.R.D.G. soldiers had never seen anything as weird as this…being helped in their desperate mission by Persian soldiers straight from the pages of history 2000 years ago.

“Prof”, Jack and Duncan didn’t know whether to be glad — or just plain terrified!

 

Introduction

Courtesy of interior artist Jose De La Fuente, this book is full of stunning imagery— of a lost Persian army from 525 B.C. seemingly returned to fight in the arid desert of North Africa in World War II.

However, one of my favourite sequences is much more straightforward but still typically dynamic — on page nine, one of our Long Range Desert Group heroes manages to bring down a Stuka dive-bomber armed only with a Thompson sub-machine gun. Fantastic stuff, and there’s a great cover from the sadly-missed Ken Barr too.

Scott Montgomery, Deputy Editor

The Lost Army, originally Commando No 222 (July 1966), re-issued as No 867 (September 1974)

Story: Skentelberry  Art: J. Fuente  Cover: Ken Barr

 


Night Intruder — Commando No 4933Comm_4933_coverMaster

Pete Owen was a fine pilot in a Mosquito night-fighter squadron, with a growing number of kills to his name.

Then he shook everybody by flying his plane, complete with the latest top-secret radar, across the Channel into German hands. He’d been playing a traitor’s game all the time, it seemed.

But why was he now in a German prison camp? And why was he spending every minute planning an escape? All he’d get in Britain would be a firing squad.

Introduction

This air/espionage/Prisoner-Of-War genre-twisting yarn is wonderfully illustrated by Repetto. He drew five Commandos book — of which this was the second — but over a short, if fairly prolific, period between November 1967 and March 1969. It’s a pity he didn’t do any more, as his line work is detailed and dynamic, and his night scenes are very atmospheric. And the late Ken Barr wraps it all up with a typically dramatic cover.

My thanks to reader Geir-Erik Nicolaysen for suggesting that we revisit this classic.

Scott Montgomery, Deputy Editor

Night Intruder, originally Commando No 307 (January 1968), re-issued as No 1011 (March 1976)

Story: McOwan  Art: Repetto  Cover: Ken Barr

 


Reluctant Assassin — Commando No 4934Comm_4934_coverMaster

 

The order was simple — “Kill Mackheim”. The reason was also simple — he was a masterful German general who could thwart the Allied advance in this region of Italy.

Captain Harry Brown, a skilled assassin, was already in the area, operating with the partisans. He was the obvious choice for the job, but there was one snag — he had lost the will to kill in cold blood…

 

Introduction

Alan Hebden is a name familiar to UK comic fans. Incredibly inventive, his scripts appeared in the likes of Battle and 2000AD in their 1970s glory days and beyond.

Alan’s first Commando credit was “Night Of Fear” (No 984, November 1975) and he has continued writing for us ever since. Indeed, the author’s popular, long-running “Convict Commandos” series will continue in the near future.

This story, however, shows how Alan can take what might initially appear to be a straightforward premise but he puts his own, unique spin on it in terms of characters and plot. So, just what would happen to a killer who lost his killer instinct…? Read on and find out.

Scott Montgomery, Deputy Editor

Reluctant Assassin, originally Commando No 2481 (June 1991)

Story: Alan Hebden  Art: Salmeron  Cover: Mike Cox

Commando Issues 4923-4926 – On Sale 16 June 2016

Commando Issues 4923-4926 – On Sale 16 June 2016

 

 Scrapper’s War — Commando No 4923Comm_4923_coverMaster

As World War I raged in the trenches of Europe another, more unusual campaign was going on in British and German East Africa.

British Lieutenant Trevor Waite and his South African counterpart, Dirk Van Ormer, had taken charge of “Scrapper”, a derelict steamer which they would pilot against sleek German Navy torpedo boats. Not only that, they also had to contend with a nasty Commanding Officer who would gladly see Scrapper put on the scrapheap once again!

Story: George Low  Art: Carlos Pino  Cover: Carlos Pino

 


Space Pilot — Commando No 4924Comm_4924_coverMaster

One day he was Flight Lieutenant “Topper” Brown — a young, unremarkable pilot and the idea of him becoming an ace was far-fetched.

Then he was shot up and crash-landed. Out of the flames rose a new Topper — a pilot who could flay anything with wings; an ace who could outwit the Luftwaffe and who could hold a Spitfire in flaming shreds together long enough to clear the skies of Nazis.

However, his mates said Topper wasn’t like himself these days. In fact they suspected he wasn’t even human anymore!

Introduction

This offbeat outing from June 1966 is certainly different from traditional Commando fare and that’s why I thought it deserved another airing. Although the story of potential extra-terrestrial influence upon an average British pilot does stretch credibility a tad, it’s done with such panache that any accusations of being far-fetched are easily forgiven. Fantastic script, art — Medrano’s interior line work simply is stunning — and cover perfectly combine here for a wonderfully oddball yarn.

Scott Montgomery, Deputy Editor

Space Pilot, originally Commando No 217 (June 1966), re-issued as No 863 (August 1974)

Story: Alan Hebden  Art: Medrano  Cover: Buccheri

 


The Flying Cowboy — Commando No 4925Comm_4925_coverMaster

John “Bronco” Bronson was a ranch hand in Arizona who became interested in fledgling flying machines such as the Wright model B.

With World War I at its peak in Europe, the American wanted to do his duty, even though the United States had not yet joined the conflict. He enlisted with the Royal Flying Corps and soon was at the controls of a Bristol F2B aircraft duelling with enemy Albatros fighters high above the trenches of the Western Front.

Bronco was unique…the War’s only flying cowboy!

Story: Bill Styles  Art: Vicente Alcazar  Cover: Janek Matysiak

 


Doomed Squadron — Commando No 4926Comm_4926_coverMaster

Sammy Baker’s Ventura Squadron had everything going for it — brand new planes, top-line aircrew, the lot. So how come they got hacked out of the sky on nearly every air raid? The answer was obvious — there had to be a spy on the station, telling the enemy when the raids were coming.

But who was the spy? And how quickly could they find him? Because until they did, every raid was doomed, right from the moment of take-off!

Introduction

Our hero is Sammy Baker, a dependable bomber commander in the best Commando tradition. However, poor Sammy is upstaged by Van Dyke — a surly goat with a penchant for chasing pilots and chewing on their caps. The horned squadron mascot definitely steals the show (as well as any R.A.F. headgear that he can). However, despite these high jinks, there is a still a fairly serious espionage tale at the heart of this book.

Scott Montgomery, Deputy Editor

Doomed Squadron, originally Commando No 1198 (February 1978), re-issued as No 2499 (September 1991)

Story: R.A. Montague  Art: Giralt  Cover: Ian Kennedy

Commando Issues 4915-4918

Commando Issues 4915-4918

 

Nemesis Of The North — Commando No 4915

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Smolenskaya Ostrov, a small island in the Barents Sea, was feared by the Russians, who had given it a much more ominous name — the Island of Death. This inhospitable place was uninhabited, apart from the packs of the ferocious polar bears who roamed its barren wastes.

Now, “Jelly” Jakes, Titch Mooney and the rest of the Convict Commandos were tasked with preventing the outbreak of a deadly virus — if they could survive long enough to complete their mission.

Story: Alan Hebden  Art: Manuel Benet  Cover: Manuel Benet

 


Duel To The Death — Commando No 4916 

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It was like a duel between two knights of old. Each combatant knew the look and reputation of the other. Only this time, on one side was a giant white Sunderland flying-boat and on the other, a black-hulled German submarine, the U-37. Dick Stapleton and an Aussie crew flew the “Flying Porcupine”; the merciless Nazi, Kapitan von Bloeke, commanded the U-37.

The North Sea convoy routes just weren’t big enough for both of them…

Introduction

Sanfelix’s stunning cover image perfectly encapsulates a truly thrilling sequence from this book (and it’s on pages 10-13, if you wish to skip ahead). Expertly drawn by veteran interior artist Gordon Livingstone, one of our heroes attempts to extinguish an engine fire on the wing of his Sunderland Flying Boat…while it is still in the air.

As far as I’m aware, I’ve never seen anything quite as daring as that in many years as a Commando reader and, latterly, as a Commando staffer. Wonderful stuff indeed.

Scott Montgomery, Deputy Editor

Duel To The Death, originally Commando No 210 (April 1966)

Story: Tyson  Art: Gordon Livingstone  Cover: Sanfelix

 


Death On The Ground — Commando No 4917

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In 1963, in the skies above a group of remote islands in the South Pacific, many military aircraft disappeared without trace — so many, if fact, that the area became known as the “New Guinea Triangle”.

When R.A.F. Flight Lieutenant Jon Day, and his C.O., Squadron Leader Richard Gibson, became embroiled in the mystery, they discovered that their dangerous foe was on the ground as well as in the air.

The Englishmen would have to improvise and use their wits to survive — even if that meant using captured weapons to bat away enemy grenades!

Story: Steve Coombs  Art: Morahin  Cover: Janek Matysiak

 


Eagle In The Sun — Commando No 4918 – 

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In the air war over Russia Anton Pozetski found life dangerous and confusing. It was easy to identify the enemy — they were the Germans and they shot at you. However, it wasn’t so easy to identify your friends. For a start, the Political Commissar and the Squadron Commander were apt to stab you in the back and they regarded the RAF as enemies.

Life was going to prove even more difficult for Anton when he joined an RAF squadron on active service.

Introduction

All of our artists are very versatile and capable of drawing any subject. However, even after five decades, Ian Kennedy is still usually our first port of call whenever we need an aeronautical cover. So, I imagine that’s what happened back in 1991 when the then-editorial team wanted an illustration featuring a Russian Polikarpov 1-16 using its propeller to shred the tail fin of an enemy Heinkel 111 bomber. Featuring Ian’s usual dynamic style and sense of drama, this is yet another prime example of his legendary work.

Scott Montgomery, Deputy Editor

Eagle In The Sun, originally Commando No 2497 (August 1991)

Story: Ian Clark  Art: Terry Patrick  Cover: Ian Kennedy

Commando Issues 4903-4906 – On Sale 6 April 2016

   

Commando Issues 4903-4906 – On Sale 6 April 2016

 

Web Of Fire — Commando No 4903

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In early 1945 the skies above Dresden burned brightly with the fire of an almighty Allied bombing raid that would go down in history.

Unfortunately for “Jelly” Jakes of the Convict Commandos, he happened to be on a secret mission in the heart of the German city that fateful night when all hell broke loose.

If he managed to survive the relentless bombardment he would also have to contend with a blast from the Commandos’ past.

 

Story: Alan Hebden  Art: Manuel Benet  Cover: Manuel Benet

 


King Of The Spits — Commando No 4904Comm_4904_coverMaster

 

The letter read:

“I, Count Ernst Von Steiger, the Red Arrow challenge the leader of this squadron to a personal duel at noon tomorrow. I shall be waiting at 16,000 feet at British Map Ref. 481609.”

And just before noon a lone Spitfire took off. At the controls was young Mike Carson, the pilot they called…KING OF THE SPITS

 

Introduction

Here is a genuine Commando classic. It has got everything that we need: great story, fantastic art and an eye-catching cover.

This solid aerial tale is brimming with action but not at the expense of the characters, all of whom are distinctive and memorable. Our stoic English hero is in charge of a tough Aussie squadron based in North Africa, but it is their charismatic German adversary who, in my opinion, steals the show…

Scott Montgomery, Deputy Editor

King Of The Spits, originally Commando No 238 (November 1966), re-issued as No 899 (January 1975)

Story: Wallace  Art: Gordon Livingstone  Cover: Ken Barr

 


Action Africa! — Commando No 4905Comm_4905_coverMaster

During World War I, Lieutenant Trevor Waite was an infantry officer posted to the colony of British East Africa. Somehow he found himself serving as part of a boat squadron. Although no sailor, he was compelled to do his duty and prove his worth to the obnoxious C.O. who was convinced that Trevor was a coward.

Although Trevor’s vessels were sturdy, reliable dhows, it looked like they might have met their match in the Germans’ superior Type 1885 torpedo boats…

 

Story: George Low  Art: Carlos Pino  Cover: Carlos Pino

 


Fighting Return — Commando No 4906Comm_4906_coverMaster

 

The traffic and the marching men were all heading in one direction…away from the advancing Germans and towards the port of Dunkirk. Only there did the retreating British troops have a chance of being evacuated to England.

However, one truck was heading the other way and it was not by mistake. Two British soldiers and a middle-aged bank manager were staging their own…FIGHTING RETURN

 

Introduction

A trio of veteran Commando creators bring you this great tale of courage and determination in the face of adversity. Writer Cyril Walker’s script has a refreshing twist where our main characters have strong reasons for heading away from the beach at Dunkirk rather than towards it.

Another old hand is interior artist C.T. Rigby who illustrates with his usual aplomb, while the equally reliable Jeff Bevan’s cover is wonderfully dynamic as well as dramatic.

Scott Montgomery, Deputy Editor

Fighting Return, originally Commando No 2477 (June 1991)

Story: C.G. Walker  Art: C.T. Rigby  Cover: Jeff Bevan